UNDP supports Turkey in charting a course to net zero by 2053

Posted December 16, 2021

With ambitions high after Turkey’s ratification of the Paris Agreement, work starts on a climate change strategy to 2050 and an action plan to 2030

Ankara, 16 December 2021 – In the wake of Turkey’s ratification earlier this year of the Paris Agreement and commitment to achieve a net-zero balance in carbon emissions by 2053, the focus has shifted to the drafting the detailed plans and adopting the policies that will be vital to ensure the country achieves these goals. These efforts took a big step forward today, with the announcement by the Ministry of Environment, Urbanization and Climate Change and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) that they are joining forces to prepare a long-term climate change strategy and an action plan that will reflect Turkey’s bolder climate ambitions.

“In terms of green development revolution, the new strategy that we will prepare together with UNDP will set out a mid-century vision for our country to improve climate resilience and provide a path towards the 2053 net-zero target, while simultaneously achieving our national development objectives and paving the way for long-term climate action with the green development vision,” said Orhan Solak, Head of Climate Change Presidency, Ministry of Environment, Urbanization and Climate Change, in addressing a conference convened to launch the preparation of a rich array of sectoral plans.

Under the Paris Agreement, countries are required to submit Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) to quantify their specific commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions as part of a global effort to limit average temperature increases to 1.5°C. They are also invited to share their long-term low-emission development strategies, to show how NDCs are reflected among national planning and development priorities. Amidst widespread recognition that the emission reductions committed by countries so far are woefully insufficient to limit global warming even to a 2.0-degree ceiling, the Glasgow Climate Summit last month agreed to speed up the reporting cycle and require countries to regroup in 2022 in Cairo to present more ambitious and credible NDCs.

“Pessimists worry that Glasgow was ‘too little, too late’ to save the planet from the worst effects of climate change,” said UNDP Resident Representative Louisa Vinton. “That is why we are so glad that countries agreed to try again next year to muster the political will needed to put a definitive brake on emissions. In this context, the timing is ideal for Turkey to adopt goals and targets reflecting the boldness and ambition that the moment requires.”

The launching event for the preparation of the strategy, action plan and revision of the NDCs brought together more than 200 representatives from the public and private sectors, academia and NGOs. The new strategy, which will be completed by the end of 2022, will include economy-wide and sector-specific targets, milestones and action plans. Together with the National Climate Change Adaptation Action Plan, it will play a key role in Turkey’s transition to low-carbon development and a climate-resilient future. Since successful climate action depends on coordinated efforts from all parts of Government and society, UNDP and the Ministry will work together to provide accurate and useful information to all actors and raise awareness among the public.

The joint climate planning initiative is supported by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), which provides funding for a long-standing UNDP programme that has assisted the Turkish Government in fulfilling its regular reporting requirements under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) since ratification.


Contact Information: Faik Uyanık, UNDP Turkey, faik.uyanik@undp.org