Nicholas Booth

Policy Adviser, Governance, Access to Justice and Human Rights

UNDP Asia-Pacific Regional Centre, Bangkok


Thailand
English, French, German, Italian
Access to justice, Governance, Human Rights, Legal empowerment, Peacebuilding, Rule of law

Nicholas Booth has been Policy Adviser for Governance, Access to Justice and Human Rights at UNDP's Asia-Pacific Regional Centre since 2013.

He was previously Policy Adviser for Rule of Law and Access to Justice at UNDP Viet Nam since 2008. He has played a key role in supporting the UN system-wide policy advocacy on key rule of law issues under the UN’s Delivering as One initiative. Previously, he served with the UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations in Kosovo from 2001-2007 as Senior Adviser on Police and Justice, helping to design and implement an institutional framework for rule of law, access to justice and protection of minority rights in a post-crisis setting.

Before joining the UN in 2001, Mr. Booth had 12 years of experience as a legal practitioner in the United Kingdom and the United States, specializing in labour rights and discrimination (focusing on race, gender, disability, and HIV and AIDS).

Mr. Booth is a UK national and holds a BCL in Law from Brasenose College, Oxford and an MA (Hons) in Law from Queens’ College, Cambridge.

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Expert's Blogs

Rule of law: the key to the "virtuous circle." Our Perspective, UNDP, 3 October 2014

Expert’s Publications
  • “The UN and MICs: A Viet Nam Case Study” – in Tom Ginsburg and Randall Peerenboom (eds.) “Law and Development in Middle-Income Countries” (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming)
  • ”Access to Justice in China and Vietnam: Introduction” in Albert Chen and Randall Peerenboom (eds.) “Legal Reform in China and Vietnam: A comparison of Asian communist regimes” (Routledge, 2010)
  • “Internationalised courts in Kosovo: An UNMIK perspective” (with J-C Cady) in Romano, Nollkaemper and Kleffner (eds.) “Internationalised Criminal Courts; Sierra Leone, East Timor, Kosovo and Cambodia” (Oxford University Press, 2004)