Human Development Report 2015

Factory workers in Haïti. Photo: UNDP in Haiti.Rapid globalization, technological revolution, demographic transitions and many other factors are creating new opportunities, but also pose risks. Photo: UNDP in Haiti

Work, not just jobs or employment, is crucial for human progress: Of the world’s 7.3 billion people, 3.2 billion are in jobs, and many others engage in unpaid care, creative and voluntary work as well as other activities or prepare themselves as future workers.

The 2015 Human Development Report ‘Work for Human Development’ examines the links, both positive and negative, between work and human development in a rapidly changing world of work. Fast globalization, technological revolution, demographic transitions and many other factors are creating new opportunities, but also posing risks. The report examines how the benefits of this new world of work are not equally distributed, generating winners and losers.

The report argues for a broader notion of work, one that goes beyond the jobs framework, to confront both persistent challenges such as human deprivations, inequalities, unsustainability, and gender imbalances in paid and unpaid work – as well as emerging ones –erosion of jobs, skills gaps, climate change and others. It concludes with a series of policy recommendations on how to enhance human progress through promotion of workers’ rights and broader access to social protection.

The 2015 Human Development Report ‘Work for Human Development’ will be launched on 14 December 2015 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, at 11 am Addis Ababa/ 3 am New York.

 

Our Perspectives

  • "Work for Human Development" report launch is opportune timing
    Oct 26, 2015

    On 14 December 2015, H.E. Hailemariam Desalegn, Prime Minister of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, UNDP Administrator Helen Clark and I will launch the 2015 Human Development Report entitled Work for Human Development. Following this launch in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, there will be a number of events around the world presenting the main messages and findings of the Report. The timing is opportune - last month, the Member States of the United Nations adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development with a set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aimed at ending extreme poverty, hunger, achieving gender equality, educating all children, and improving global health before 2030. In November, the Valetta Summit on Migration will take place, followed in December by the vital climate change negotiations in Paris.

  • How will the world we shape affect their lives?
    Oct 19, 2015

    Can an 18-year-old living in one of the world’s most remote places have a say in how the world is shaped? I met Sung Thi My during a field visit to the mountainous province of Yen Bai, where we were surveying people about the world they want in 2015 and beyond. The UN’s MY World survey is aimed at capturing people’s voices, views and priorities so world leaders can be informed, as they define the next set of global goals.

  • Simplicity, thy name is MDGs
    Sep 22, 2015

    In this blog series, UNDP experts and practitioners share their experiences and views on working with the Millennium Development Goals. When Dr. Mahbub Ul Haq presented the somewhat crude Human Development Index (HDI) in 1990, he was convinced that a single number, which is easily understandable, could convince policy makers, academics and politicians that GDP per capita was not a comprehensive measure of human wellbeing. Similarly, the MDGs as an agenda and framework, though a crude measure like HDI, was very simple and easy for a practitioner like me to communicate and convince stakeholders on its importance and relevance.

  • From neglect to respect: Changing Georgia's mental health approach
    Sep 15, 2015

    Visiting a psychiatric clinic can leave a lasting impression. I had the opportunity to visit a psychiatric hospital in Tbilisi to meet the doctors and experts taking part in designing a national reform of mental healthcare in Georgia. The first thing I noticed was the hospital’s size. The huge concrete building looked left over from the Soviet era. Even after entering, it seemed more like an administrative center than a hospital housing more than 150 patients.

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