Human Development Report 2015

Factory workers in Haïti. Photo: UNDP in Haiti.
Rapid globalization, technological revolution, demographic transitions and many other factors are creating new opportunities, but also pose risks. Photo: UNDP in Haiti

Work, not just jobs or employment, is crucial for human progress: Of the world’s 7.3 billion people, 3.2 billion are in jobs, and many others engage in unpaid care, creative and voluntary work as well as other activities or prepare themselves as future workers.

The 2015 Human Development Report ‘Work for Human Development’ examines the links, both positive and negative, between work and human development in a rapidly changing world of work. Fast globalization, technological revolution, demographic transitions and many other factors are creating new opportunities, but also posing risks. The report examines how the benefits of this new world of work are not equally distributed, generating winners and losers.

The report argues for a broader notion of work, one that goes beyond the jobs framework, to confront both persistent challenges such as human deprivations, inequalities, unsustainability, and gender imbalances in paid and unpaid work – as well as emerging ones –erosion of jobs, skills gaps, climate change and others. It concludes with a series of policy recommendations on how to enhance human progress through promotion of workers’ rights and broader access to social protection.

The 2015 Human Development Report ‘Work for Human Development’ will be launched on 14 December 2015 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, at 11 am Addis Ababa/ 3 am New York.

 

Our Perspectives

  • Latin America and the Caribbean: Looking beyond income to build on recent progressJun 16, 2016Latin America and the Caribbean: Looking beyond income to build on recent progressThe countries of Latin America and the Caribbean experienced historic economic and social transformation in recent years. This has led to a considerable reduction in poverty and inequality and to advances in closing gender, labour and education gaps. These achievements are the result of a favourable economic environment as well as proactive social inclusion policies. Despite this, 25 million to 30 million people risk falling back into poverty—a third of those who left poverty from 2003 to 2013. The most vulnerable are the newly employed, women and workers in the informal sectors of the economy. Many face social exclusion that cannot be resolved with higher income, such as discrimination due to ethnic or racial group, skin colour, sexual identity, migrant status or disability.

  • Human Development – the Way AheadApr 27, 2016Human Development – the Way AheadOver the last quarter of a century, Human Development Reports have extensively influenced the development discourse, provided a strong lens to assess human well-being, and informed policy making. But the world today is different from 1990. Impressive human development progress has been achieved; yet advances have been uneven and significant deprivations still persist. As the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development states, there is a critical need for a transformational change in development, so that no one is left behind. From a human development perspective, the time has come to focus on three fundamental aspects: extending the frontiers of the paradigm, reviewing how human development is measured; and revisiting the policy options linking various strategies and focusing on institutions at country and global level. This is why the theme of the jubilee HDR is Human Development – the Way Ahead.

  • Our Rights. Our Freedoms. Always.Dec 10, 2015Our Rights. Our Freedoms. Always.In celebrating 2015 International Human Rights Day, we are invited to reflect on the importance of the freedoms we enjoy and to recommit to supporting the fundamental freedoms of all. UNDP’s work is based on the belief that people experience poverty, deprivation or exclusion not only as a lack of income but also as a lack of education or health care or a lack of dignity and participation in their community. These dimensions of peoples’ lives have been considered so important by governments all around the world that they have recognized them as entitlements, as human rights, both in national and in international law.

  • Bashi's journey may signal a bigger refugee crisis to comeOct 28, 2015Bashi's journey may signal a bigger refugee crisis to comeBashi, a young man who fled from conflict in Somalia, is one of many Africans making the journey to Europe for a better life.

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Work for human development

The report examines the links, both positive and negative, between work and human development in a rapidly changing world of work, and how the benefits of this new world of work are not equally distributed, generating winners and losers.

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HDR 2015