Cote d’Ivoire: Improving water access in former conflict areas


Access to clean water has remained a challenge due to lack of power sources. © UNDP Côte d'Ivoire

More than 61,000 people living in western Cote d’Ivoire have access to clean water through new and rehabilitated water sources, as part of the conflict recovery process in the country.

A decade-long crisis saw hundreds of thousands of people displaced, and much of the country’s infrastructure and facilities such as schools and hospitals destroyed. Water treatment centres fell into disrepair, and water point maintenance stalled, risking the spread of disease.

Highlights

  • More than 61,000 people have better access to water through rehabilitated water pumps and water treatment of 100 wells.
  • Management committees of 10 members each - half of whom are women - are set up in each villages targeted by the programme.
  • Rehabilitation has begun for 45 additional water pumps in 39 villages in Gbêkê, the central area of the country.

Since the crisis ended, access to clean water has remained a challenge due to lack of power sources and equipment for maintenance which hampers the rebuilding of water infrastructure.

Starting in January 2011, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has treated with chlorine 100 wells in the town of Duékoué, rehabilitated 12 water pumps in eight nearby villages mainly inhabited by internally displaced persons, and built an additional 10 wells in 10 other villages.

“Access to safe water gives us life," says Modeste Kohou, chief of Niambly village, some four kilometers from Duékoué, where two hydraulic pumps were rehabilitated through this Programme of Support for Poverty Reduction.

To ensure the wells and water pumps are maintained, management committees of 10 members each - half of whom are women - were set up in each of the 18 villages targeted by the programme. UNDP trained the committee members on how to manage clean water sources, water purification, prevention of waterborne diseases, and chlorination techniques for the improved wells.

During 2012 the Programme of Support for Poverty Reduction has begun rehabilitation of 45 water pumps in 39 villages in Gbêkê, in the central area of the country.