UNDP Around the world

Our stories

  • 3 continents, 3 lakes in danger
    Mar 22, 2017

    There is no shortage of water on the planet. More than two-thirds of the earth’s surface is covered in the stuff. But 97 percent of this is salty ocean water. The remaining freshwater is mostly found in the form of ice, leaving precious little available for human use.

  •  Silent Roar : Supporting Snow Leopard Conservation for Sustainable Development
    Oct 19, 2016

    Despite contributing significantly to the cultural identity of the diverse ethnic groups and nations that call the high mountain regions their home, the number of snow leopards is rapidly dwindling. In the 12 countries where they are currently found there are only an estimated 4,000 snow leopards left.

  • Transforming challenges into opportunities
    Oct 14, 2016

    Over the past decade, Peru's economy has been one of the fastest growing in Latin America. The country has cut poverty and extreme poverty in half, especially in rural areas. However, not everyone has reaped the benefits of this growth. A large segment of the population is relegated to outlying neighborhoods of large cities, where poverty has been rising in recent years.

  • Keeping children worm-free in Tanzania
    Sep 9, 2016

    Also known as "snail fever", schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease carried by fresh water snails. It is one of the most widespread tropical diseases in the world after malaria, affecting more than 249 million people globally, including 100 million children. In Tanzania, the first cases of schistosomiasis were reported in the early 19th century.

  • Defending the Orontes: A community effort to restore a city lifeline
    Nov 3, 2015

    A resilience project in Syria has put together a 40-member team to clean up the Orontes, picking up garbage along the river banks and surrounding gardens and replanting trees and agricultural crops where possible.

  • Banking on community: Inclusive finance for poverty reduction in DR Congo
    Oct 14, 2016

    Nearly 55 percent of the population is classed as “financially excluded”, and potential borrowers are often unable to provide the guarantees required to receive credit.