Integrating Environment into Development


Photo: Cape Verde

The natural environment is the foundation on which poverty reduction efforts and sustainable development must be built. Poor people everywhere depend critically on environmental assets and energy resources for their livelihoods and well-being. It is widely recognized that recent and ongoing global shocks – food, fuel, financial, climate change – have linkages, if not in some cases direct lineage, to environmental issues related to the use and management environmental systems and services. Therefore, mainstreaming environment and sustainable development, including climate change, in national development planning and implementation is central to UNDP’s poverty reduction and MDG mission.

Related Publications and Resources

  • International Waters – Delivering ResultsJun 15, 2012International Waters – Delivering Results

  • Agency Collaboration for UNCCD: Current Situation and Lessons LearnedAug 25, 2003Agency Collaboration for UNCCD: Current Situation and Lessons LearnedThis joint publication of the Facilitation Committee of the Global Mechanism for the UNCCD CoP-6, (25 Aug - 5 Sept 2003, Havana, Cuba), presents short briefs by Committee members highlighting their commitment to CCD process and its implementation. It provides some lessons learnt from collaboration between members through a matrix of successful collaborative efforts to date.

  • Oct 1, 2006Dryland futures: East and Southern Africa-Three critical factorsThe publication looks to the prospect for the East and Southern African drylands in the context of recent history and the changes that have occurred in the realms of policy, economic and social conditions and the environment. It further points out three of the biggest challenges facing East and Southern Africa in the foreseeable future— climate change, land tenure and HIV/AIDS.

  • Challenge Paper: Poverty and the DrylandsSep 1, 2001Challenge Paper: Poverty and the DrylandsAs part of UNDP's Global Development Imperative Challenge Paper Series, this publication challenges the current wisdom on the distribution and condition of drylands populations and offers more realistic scenarios that decision-makers can take seriously. The paper sets out this challenge and introduces some of the new evidence that is required.

  • Mar 26, 2003Challenge Paper: Pastoralism and Mobility in the DrylandsThe paper notes that pastoralists have been ill-served by development policies due to myths and misunderstandings of pastoralism, which distort policy-making about pastoral livelihood systems. The paper outlines new policies to address the marginalization of pastoralists from mainstream society.