Mine action


Juwa Stella Anyazo works with an all-female demining team in Yei, South Sudan, supported by Norwegian People’s Aid and UNMAS partner. For more information about this team, watch the UNMAS film “Betty” shown in this exhibition. Photo: UNMAS/Marco Grob

Our Goal

Long after conflicts are over, landmines, abandoned munitions and other explosive remnants of war still kill and maim, sometimes for decades. They are responsible for an average of 11 deaths per day, and countless more severe injuries.

Development and economic growth often increases the demand for land, so that communities can plant more crops and improve food security, or build new housing, roads and infrastructure. Mines and explosive remnants of war not only pose a health and safety risk - in many post conflict countries, they impede economic growth by preventing people from using land. They also deprive people of basic services; hinder the use of natural resources; and severely undermine the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.

The global economic impact of unexploded ordnance is estimated to be in the hundreds of billions of dollars a year; costs that are often borne by developing countries that can least afford them.

In fragile societies, unexploded ordnance can also stop refugees and displaced people from returning home, adversely affecting stability, security, and the realization of long-term peace.

Projects and Initiatives

  • UNDP in Mozambique

    Women Working for a Mine-free Mozambique

    “You could say my job is exciting,” said Margarida Luis Sitoe, a manual de-miner who works with UNDP’s humanitarian demining partners, Apopo. “It’s hard work butmore

Our Perspectives

Stories from Laos: 'I'm the first female bomb disposal expert'

During the second Indochina War between 1964 and 1974, more than 2 million tons of bombs, including cluster bombs, along with other ordnance were dropped on More

'Neither a producer nor user be': Zambia and cluster munitions | Kanni Wignaraja

Zambia is familiar with the issue of cluster munitions, a form of explosive weapon that can be air-dropped or ground-launched and releases smaller sub-munitions. Commonly known More

Taking aim at lax arms control laws | Jordan Ryan

We need to better regulate the international arms trade. Today. Thanks in part to the efforts of organizations like the United Nations (UN) and its Member More

The end of the line for an insidious weapon of war? | Neil Buhne

I remember first learning of “clusters” when I worked in Pakistan in the early 90s and saw injured Afghan children who had picked one up, losing More

Mine Action 2014: Women in Mine Action/Life After Landmines and UxOs
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Additional resources
  • Cluster Munition and Landmine Monitor English
  • United Nations Mine Action Service English
  • Secretary-General’s Message for 2013 - International Day for Mine Awareness and Assistance in Mine Action English
  • International Campaign to Ban Landmines English