Immediate Crisis Response - Overview

 After severe flooding, a family sits waist-deep in flood water, in front of their home. Photo: UNDP Cambodia

 

UNDP works to help ensure that the humanitarian response to the emergency also contributes to longer-term development objectives and more resilient communities, laying the best possible ground work for development work beyond the immediate emergency; and helping people move from humanitarian dependency to self-sufficiency as soon as possible.UNDP works to help ensure that the humanitarian response to the emergency also contributes to longer-term development objectives and more resilient communities, laying the best possible ground work for development work beyond the immediate emergency; and helping people move from humanitarian dependency to self-sufficiency as soon as possible.

UNDP ensures public services are functioning as early as possible; affected people are given emergency employment, an income, and trained in construction techniques and other skills to start the process of rebuilding infrastructure and removing rubble; and small businesses are given start up grants, financing and other help to keep communities viable and functioning.

UNDP advisors also work with and train local public servants to make sure that the buildings, infrastructure and communities being reconstructed meet a minimal code of disaster resistance, and that where possible, the underlying triggers of a conflict or disaster are addressed.

UNDP’s immediate crisis response package:

Projects and Initiatives

  • Response to the crisis in South Sudan

    UNDP in South Sudan continues to operate in spite of the current crisis, supporting national, state and local governments to deliver development services, as well as community security and stabilization for at-risk communities.

  • Renewed hope in Lebanon
    Mar 28, 2017

    The ramifications of the Syrian crisis are far reaching in all its neighbouring countries, but are especially felt in Lebanon, a country 
still recovering from the scars of its own civil war. The crisis has affected Lebanon in many ways: slowing down economic growth, amplifying social divisions along confessional lines and spawning political paralysis. The most dramatic impact is the influx of over a million Syrian refugees, who now constitute around a quarter of the population. Lebanon now has the highest per-capita concentration of refugees in the world. Such combined shocks have greatly reduced Lebanon’s chances of meeting its development targets. Even before the outset of the Syrian crisis, Lebanon had a mixed performance on the Millennium Development Goals, registering good progress in nutrition, health and education, but lagging behind in key goals such as poverty reduction and environmental sustainability. The crisis has further exacerbated these gaps – particularly as almost 90 per cent of Lebanon’s Syrian reflive within the poorest Lebanese communities. The exceptional magnitude of the crisis has prompted the UN to mount one of the largest and most complex response operations in the world. This is to meet the needs of both the Syrian refugees and – just as importantly – the Lebanese hosting communities.

  • UN statement on heavy rains in Peru
    Mar 27, 2017

    The United Nations System in Peru continues to work in a coordinated manner with the Peruvian Government in face of the situation caused by heavy rains and landslides in various regions of the country.

  • Lessons from a year of post-ISIL stabilization in Iraq
    Mar 7, 2017

    In Mosul a battle is raging to take back the city from ISIL. As the fighting ends, essential work is ramping up to make sure that people who have been displaced by occupation and war can return to their homes as fast as possible - and stay there. Already in the past year, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), in close cooperation with the Iraqi government, the provincial authorities and the international coalition, has helped to re-boot social and economic recovery in 18 locations that have been liberated from ISIL, including Falluja and Tikrit. Our US$790 million Funding Facility for Immediate Stabilization (FFIS) project is designed to support the early recovery effort in liberated towns through a three-month, high-impact programme to motivate millions of displaced Iraqis to return to their communities from camps and informal settlements across the country. UNDP is making sure that people get services like water, clinics, schools, police stations, markets and government buildings. Families are receiving help to rebuild damaged homes, public infrastructure is being rehabilitated and small businesses are being supported with cash grants to get started again. These actions are essential to ensure those who were forced to flee are able to return and stay in the area, making them productive citizens once again. It is the first step towards post-conflict recovery and peace building.

  • Funding Facility for Stabilization - Annual Report 2016
  • Stabilizing Iraq
    Mar 8, 2017

    The humanitarian, security and development crisis in Iraq is amongst the most volatile and severe in the region. The occupation of approximately one-third of Iraq’s territory by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) resulted in the displacement of 3.3 million Iraqis.