Immediate Crisis Response - Overview


After severe flooding, a family sits waist-deep in flood water, in front of their home. Photo: UNDP Cambodia

 

UNDP works to help ensure that the humanitarian response to the emergency also contributes to longer-term development objectives and more resilient communities, laying the best possible ground work for development work beyond the immediate emergency; and helping people move from humanitarian dependency to self-sufficiency as soon as possible.UNDP works to help ensure that the humanitarian response to the emergency also contributes to longer-term development objectives and more resilient communities, laying the best possible ground work for development work beyond the immediate emergency; and helping people move from humanitarian dependency to self-sufficiency as soon as possible.

UNDP ensures public services are functioning as early as possible; affected people are given emergency employment, an income, and trained in construction techniques and other skills to start the process of rebuilding infrastructure and removing rubble; and small businesses are given start up grants, financing and other help to keep communities viable and functioning.

UNDP advisors also work with and train local public servants to make sure that the buildings, infrastructure and communities being reconstructed meet a minimal code of disaster resistance, and that where possible, the underlying triggers of a conflict or disaster are addressed.

UNDP’s immediate crisis response package:

Projects and Initiatives

  • Giving a voice to female victims in GuatemalaOct 27, 2014Giving a voice to female victims in GuatemalaA transitional justice project provides support and reparation for female victims of the domestic armed conflict in Guatemala.

  • A new Global Alliance to 'think urban' in humanitarian responseJun 3, 2016A new Global Alliance to 'think urban' in humanitarian responseThe humanitarian situation is changing. There are now more refugees and internally displaced persons than at any time since the end of the Second World War and 60 percent of these are in urban areas. We need to ‘think urban’ when we design our responses to these increasing crises. Rapid and poorly planned urbanization is driving vulnerability in towns and cities around the world. Humanitarian emergencies are increasingly occurring in towns and cities. Responding to this reality requires new ways of working. Major international humanitarian responses are often not closely tied to local municipal actors that understand their communities’ ongoing needs.

  • UNDP Goodwill Ambassador Antonio Banderas invites people to join the global conversation on Rio+20May 22, 2012UNDP Goodwill Ambassador Antonio Banderas invites people to join the global conversation on Rio+20World renowned Spanish actor and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Goodwill Ambassador Antonio Banderas today launched a public service announcement aiming at inviting people to join the global conversation alongside the 2012 UN Conference on Sustainable Development “Rio+20”.

  • Supporting Insider Mediation: Strengthening Resilience to Conflict and TurbulenceJan 22, 2015Supporting Insider Mediation: Strengthening Resilience to Conflict and TurbulenceThis guidance note builds on the experience of UNDP and the EU in supporting national counterparts in preventing and resolving violent tensions, and is the first attempt at documenting and distilling best practices on insider mediation.

  • From disaster relief to risk reduction in AlbaniaFrom disaster relief to risk reduction in Albania

  • Small data and big humanitarian challenges: why innovation mattersMay 24, 2016Small data and big humanitarian challenges: why innovation mattersUNDP joined with UN partners UNICEF, WFP and OCHA, the governments of Finland and Denmark, private sector partners Vodafone and Microsoft and the Flowminder Foundation, to share the latest on innovation and technology breakthroughs in the development and humanitarian sectors.