Immediate Crisis Response - Overview


After severe flooding, a family sits waist-deep in flood water, in front of their home. Photo: UNDP Cambodia

 

UNDP works to help ensure that the humanitarian response to the emergency also contributes to longer-term development objectives and more resilient communities, laying the best possible ground work for development work beyond the immediate emergency; and helping people move from humanitarian dependency to self-sufficiency as soon as possible.UNDP works to help ensure that the humanitarian response to the emergency also contributes to longer-term development objectives and more resilient communities, laying the best possible ground work for development work beyond the immediate emergency; and helping people move from humanitarian dependency to self-sufficiency as soon as possible.

UNDP ensures public services are functioning as early as possible; affected people are given emergency employment, an income, and trained in construction techniques and other skills to start the process of rebuilding infrastructure and removing rubble; and small businesses are given start up grants, financing and other help to keep communities viable and functioning.

UNDP advisors also work with and train local public servants to make sure that the buildings, infrastructure and communities being reconstructed meet a minimal code of disaster resistance, and that where possible, the underlying triggers of a conflict or disaster are addressed.

UNDP’s immediate crisis response package:

Projects and Initiatives

  • Transitional justiceTransitional justiceMay 29, 2015Following large-scale violence, conflict, or political upheaval societies must be enabled to address past grievances and serious human rights abuses. Nationally led transitional justice processes contribute to atonement for past violence and human rights violations and can facilitate state accountability. These practices strengthen trust, establish the conditions for peace and democratic governance, and help societies guard against a relapse into systematic discrimination or violence.

  • Community security and armed violence reductionCommunity security and armed violence reductionMay 29, 2015

  • "My legs started shaking uncontrollably, and suddenly I fell.""My legs started shaking uncontrollably, and suddenly I fell."May 29, 2015Only weeks after the terrible earthquake that devastated Nepal, I was with a team of engineers working with families from the Sindhupalchock district, a rural area in the centre of Nepal where barely a house was left standing. <BR><BR> As a UNDP regional crisis adviser, I was focused on the job at hand -- but fate had other plans. <BR><BR> Another quake hit.

  • "My legs started shaking uncontrollably, and suddenly I fell""My legs started shaking uncontrollably, and suddenly I fell"May 21, 2015The truth is I didn’t know what time it was.<BR><BR> I was with a team of engineers working with families from the Sindhupalchock district, a rural area in the centre of Nepal where barely a small house was left standing. As fate would have it, we were delayed by a few minutes. The new earthquake caught us on the road and fortunately there were no victims.

  • Helen Clark: Remarks at the UNDP Annual Meeting on the Rule of Law in Crisis and Fragile SituationsHelen Clark: Remarks at the UNDP Annual Meeting on the Rule of Law in Crisis and Fragile SituationsMay 28, 2015Administrator Helen Clark addresses the 2015 UNDP Annual Meeting on the Rule of Law in Crisis and Fragile Situations.

  • Women Still Earn 24 Percent Less Than Men, 20 Years On  Women Still Earn 24 Percent Less Than Men, 20 Years On May 6, 2015UN Development Programme (UNDP) Administrator Helen Clark called 2015 a “new opportunity” to achieve gender equality as she kicked off a three-day global meeting to mark the 20th anniversary of the landmark conference on women that enshrined the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action.