Immediate Crisis Response - Overview


After severe flooding, a family sits waist-deep in flood water, in front of their home. Photo: UNDP Cambodia

 

UNDP works to help ensure that the humanitarian response to the emergency also contributes to longer-term development objectives and more resilient communities, laying the best possible ground work for development work beyond the immediate emergency; and helping people move from humanitarian dependency to self-sufficiency as soon as possible.UNDP works to help ensure that the humanitarian response to the emergency also contributes to longer-term development objectives and more resilient communities, laying the best possible ground work for development work beyond the immediate emergency; and helping people move from humanitarian dependency to self-sufficiency as soon as possible.

UNDP ensures public services are functioning as early as possible; affected people are given emergency employment, an income, and trained in construction techniques and other skills to start the process of rebuilding infrastructure and removing rubble; and small businesses are given start up grants, financing and other help to keep communities viable and functioning.

UNDP advisors also work with and train local public servants to make sure that the buildings, infrastructure and communities being reconstructed meet a minimal code of disaster resistance, and that where possible, the underlying triggers of a conflict or disaster are addressed.

UNDP’s immediate crisis response package:

Projects and Initiatives

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Voting, not Violence, in Kenya

Days before a constitutional referendum took place in Kenya, employees at the Uwiano Platform in the capital of Nairobi received an alarming SMS.  The message came from a resident of Chebarus village who said his familiy had been surrounded by an unknown armed group. The assailants had threatenmore

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Bringing economic security to women in Nepal

Dipmala Mahato is beginning to feel the benefits that financial prosperity can bring. While she still lives in a one-room home, constructed of mud and roughly the size of a table-tennis board, she now earns a decent income selling her vegetables in the twice-weekly local market. Mahato is one of 32 more

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Supporting recovery and local governance in Somalia

It is early morning and Amina[1] has another busy day ahead. The mother of two must get her children off to school and finish some housekeeping before she can attend to her small business, selling second-hand clothes and household supplies beside her corrugated-iron-roofed house. In spite of her hecmore