Immediate Crisis Response - Overview


After severe flooding, a family sits waist-deep in flood water, in front of their home. Photo: UNDP Cambodia

 

UNDP works to help ensure that the humanitarian response to the emergency also contributes to longer-term development objectives and more resilient communities, laying the best possible ground work for development work beyond the immediate emergency; and helping people move from humanitarian dependency to self-sufficiency as soon as possible.UNDP works to help ensure that the humanitarian response to the emergency also contributes to longer-term development objectives and more resilient communities, laying the best possible ground work for development work beyond the immediate emergency; and helping people move from humanitarian dependency to self-sufficiency as soon as possible.

UNDP ensures public services are functioning as early as possible; affected people are given emergency employment, an income, and trained in construction techniques and other skills to start the process of rebuilding infrastructure and removing rubble; and small businesses are given start up grants, financing and other help to keep communities viable and functioning.

UNDP advisors also work with and train local public servants to make sure that the buildings, infrastructure and communities being reconstructed meet a minimal code of disaster resistance, and that where possible, the underlying triggers of a conflict or disaster are addressed.

UNDP’s immediate crisis response package:

Projects and Initiatives

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China: Building back better and greener

Before the devastating Wenchuan earthquake in southwestern China on 12 May 2008, 62-year-old Qing Liehua’s main source of income and food for his family was chicken farming. After the earthquake destroyed his home in Qinghe Village, Sichuan Province, however, he lost everything, including his chickemore

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Haitian women rebuild their lives one brick at a time

The main driving force for earthquake-damaged house rebuilding in Haiti is not the government, the private sector, NGOs or international organizations. Families and communities have been playing a vital role, taking the task to build back a more resilient country into their own hands—especially womemore

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Rebuilding war-torn communities in Burundi

The village of Gitukura, in the northern Burundi province of Cibitoke, has experienced firsthand the devastating consequences of two decades of ethnic conflict and civil war. Located on the Rwandan border, its inhabitants, mostly women and children, live in almost complete isolation and deprivation.more

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Supporting recovery and local governance in Somalia

It is early morning and Amina[1] has another busy day ahead. The mother of two must get her children off to school and finish some housekeeping before she can attend to her small business, selling second-hand clothes and household supplies beside her corrugated-iron-roofed house. In spite of her hecmore

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New nets help fishermen in Gaza become self-reliant

The Swedish Village, a remote village of fishermen in the far south of the Gaza Strip in the occupied Palestinian territory, is home to some 95 households living under extreme poverty. Visitors to the Village – built by the Swedish Government in the 1960s – can immediately see the poor infrastructurmore

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Cote d’Ivoire: Improving water access in former conflict areas

More than 61,000 people living in western Cote d’Ivoire have access to clean water through new and rehabilitated water sources, as part of the conflict recovery process in the country. A decade-long crisis saw hundreds of thousands of people displaced, and much of the country’s infrastructure and famore