Immediate Crisis Response - Overview

 After severe flooding, a family sits waist-deep in flood water, in front of their home. Photo: UNDP Cambodia

 

UNDP works to help ensure that the humanitarian response to the emergency also contributes to longer-term development objectives and more resilient communities, laying the best possible ground work for development work beyond the immediate emergency; and helping people move from humanitarian dependency to self-sufficiency as soon as possible.UNDP works to help ensure that the humanitarian response to the emergency also contributes to longer-term development objectives and more resilient communities, laying the best possible ground work for development work beyond the immediate emergency; and helping people move from humanitarian dependency to self-sufficiency as soon as possible.

UNDP ensures public services are functioning as early as possible; affected people are given emergency employment, an income, and trained in construction techniques and other skills to start the process of rebuilding infrastructure and removing rubble; and small businesses are given start up grants, financing and other help to keep communities viable and functioning.

UNDP advisors also work with and train local public servants to make sure that the buildings, infrastructure and communities being reconstructed meet a minimal code of disaster resistance, and that where possible, the underlying triggers of a conflict or disaster are addressed.

UNDP’s immediate crisis response package:

Projects and Initiatives

  • Funding Facility for Stabilization - Annual Report 2016
  • Stabilizing Iraq
    Mar 8, 2017

    The humanitarian, security and development crisis in Iraq is amongst the most volatile and severe in the region. The occupation of approximately one-third of Iraq’s territory by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) resulted in the displacement of 3.3 million Iraqis.

  • Responding to the crisis in Yemen

    UNDP is working with local and international partners to build resilience in Yemen by supporting communities and key institutions to lay the foundation for recovery and state-building.

  • Supporting Syrians and the region

    Six years into the conflict in Syria, 75 percent of the population are living in poverty, while millions of Syrians seek refuge in neighbouring countries.

  • Haiti: From recovery to sustainable development

    Since the devastating earthquake of 12 January 2010, enormous efforts have been made to help the government achieve its objectives and to improve Haitians’ living conditions.

  • A global partnership builds resilience and renews hope of Yemenis
    Jan 18, 2017

    Yemen is facing an unprecedented political, humanitarian, and development crisis. Long the poorest country in the Arab region, over half its population was living below the poverty line before the current conflict worsened. That number has risen steeply, with over 21.5 million people needing humanitarian assistance now—close to 80 percent of the country’s 28 million people. Yemen’s political transition unravelled into full-blown war in March 2015. It has had a catastrophic impact: We in the United Nations estimate it’s already resulted in over 10,000 civilian injuries and deaths. Over 3 million people are displaced. About US$19 billion in damage to infrastructure and in other economic losses have been caused so far. The conflict has further impoverished the Yemeni population and increased their vulnerability. At least 8 million people are severely food insecure, with over 460,000 children suffering from acute malnutrition. The remarkable resilience of the Yemeni population is being tested to its limits. The war has pushed vulnerable members of the Yemeni population to the brink of famine.