Immediate Crisis Response - Overview


After severe flooding, a family sits waist-deep in flood water, in front of their home. Photo: UNDP Cambodia

 

UNDP works to help ensure that the humanitarian response to the emergency also contributes to longer-term development objectives and more resilient communities, laying the best possible ground work for development work beyond the immediate emergency; and helping people move from humanitarian dependency to self-sufficiency as soon as possible.UNDP works to help ensure that the humanitarian response to the emergency also contributes to longer-term development objectives and more resilient communities, laying the best possible ground work for development work beyond the immediate emergency; and helping people move from humanitarian dependency to self-sufficiency as soon as possible.

UNDP ensures public services are functioning as early as possible; affected people are given emergency employment, an income, and trained in construction techniques and other skills to start the process of rebuilding infrastructure and removing rubble; and small businesses are given start up grants, financing and other help to keep communities viable and functioning.

UNDP advisors also work with and train local public servants to make sure that the buildings, infrastructure and communities being reconstructed meet a minimal code of disaster resistance, and that where possible, the underlying triggers of a conflict or disaster are addressed.

UNDP’s immediate crisis response package:

Projects and Initiatives

  • Rebuilding war-torn communities in BurundiRebuilding war-torn communities in BurundiMay 5, 2015

  • Supporting recovery and local governance in SomaliaSupporting recovery and local governance in SomaliaMay 5, 2015

  • Ebola response in West AfricaEbola response in West AfricaMay 5, 2015Nearly a year into the Ebola crisis ravaging West Africa, the deadly disease’s knock-on effects are huge. What started as a public health crisis in Guinea on 26 December 2013 degenerated into development crises in the three epicentre countries in less than six months. As of January 2015, there were 20,721 EVD cases in total: 2,775 in Guinea, 8,157 in Liberia, and 9,789 in Sierra Leone.

  • Nepal’s opportunity to seize the moment for the future of its peopleNepal’s opportunity to seize the moment for the future of its peopleMay 4, 2015When the elders in my family spoke of the 1934 earthquake, they talked about how scary it had been, and the damage it left behind. How Dharara, once the tallest structure in Kathmandu, was rebuilt. I was in Kathmandu this time around and it was terrifying to experience the earthquake. I took refuge in my aunt’s house, along with 25 other people whose homes, like many across the city, were either damaged or destroyed.

  • Building Safely to Prevent the Loss of Life Building Safely to Prevent the Loss of Life May 1, 2015Following the huge earthquake in Nepal, UNDP reports on efforts in the country to withstand future disasters.

  • Earthquake in Nepal devastates lives and small businessesEarthquake in Nepal devastates lives and small businessesApr 30, 2015About 10 years ago, Ram Chandra Neupane worked hard to lift his family out of poverty. His small poultry business afforded him and his extended family a decent living. Then in a flash last week, it all fell apart.