Immediate Crisis Response - Overview


After severe flooding, a family sits waist-deep in flood water, in front of their home. Photo: UNDP Cambodia

 

UNDP works to help ensure that the humanitarian response to the emergency also contributes to longer-term development objectives and more resilient communities, laying the best possible ground work for development work beyond the immediate emergency; and helping people move from humanitarian dependency to self-sufficiency as soon as possible.UNDP works to help ensure that the humanitarian response to the emergency also contributes to longer-term development objectives and more resilient communities, laying the best possible ground work for development work beyond the immediate emergency; and helping people move from humanitarian dependency to self-sufficiency as soon as possible.

UNDP ensures public services are functioning as early as possible; affected people are given emergency employment, an income, and trained in construction techniques and other skills to start the process of rebuilding infrastructure and removing rubble; and small businesses are given start up grants, financing and other help to keep communities viable and functioning.

UNDP advisors also work with and train local public servants to make sure that the buildings, infrastructure and communities being reconstructed meet a minimal code of disaster resistance, and that where possible, the underlying triggers of a conflict or disaster are addressed.

UNDP’s immediate crisis response package:

Projects and Initiatives

  • TICAD VI ends with Africa and Japan 3-year plan for continued engagementAug 29, 2016TICAD VI ends with Africa and Japan 3-year plan for continued engagementThe Nairobi Declaration sets out a three-year plan to promote structural economic transformation, resilient healthcare systems and social stability for shared prosperity.

  • Post-Paris: paving the way for zero carbon growthDec 18, 2015Post-Paris: paving the way for zero carbon growthHaving witnessed the international community reach (and celebrate) a global climate deal in Paris last week, I have been reflecting on the journey that brought us here, as well as picturing the long but important road ahead. First, while there has been much talk about the relative significance of the Paris agreement, I would like to echo a sentiment expressed by the New Yorker’s Elizabeth Kolbert: the deal is a success simply because the alternative was no deal at all. Business as usual is not an option, and the Paris agreement, while not perfect, is a landmark that brings together 196 parties. The bottom-up nature of the agreement is certainly a worthy first step.

  • Protecting development requires an ambitious, actionable framework for disaster risk reduction Nov 17, 2014Protecting development requires an ambitious, actionable framework for disaster risk reduction

  • Early RecoveryEarly Recovery

  • UNDP Rule of Law Annual Report 2015Jun 14, 2016UNDP Rule of Law Annual Report 2015UNDP has been a leader in supporting the rule of law in countries affected by crisis through its Global Programme for Strengthening the Rule of Law in Crisis-Affected and Fragile Situations. This Annual Report looks back over the last 8 years and sets the stage for the implementation of Phase III (2016–2019).

  • A safe home and a sense of normalcy for displaced families in UkraineJun 19, 2015A safe home and a sense of normalcy for displaced families in UkraineUNDP works with the Government, donors and civil society partners to provide comprehensive support and early recovery programmes for those displaced by the conflict in eastern Ukraine.