Immediate Crisis Response - Overview


After severe flooding, a family sits waist-deep in flood water, in front of their home. Photo: UNDP Cambodia

 

UNDP works to help ensure that the humanitarian response to the emergency also contributes to longer-term development objectives and more resilient communities, laying the best possible ground work for development work beyond the immediate emergency; and helping people move from humanitarian dependency to self-sufficiency as soon as possible.UNDP works to help ensure that the humanitarian response to the emergency also contributes to longer-term development objectives and more resilient communities, laying the best possible ground work for development work beyond the immediate emergency; and helping people move from humanitarian dependency to self-sufficiency as soon as possible.

UNDP ensures public services are functioning as early as possible; affected people are given emergency employment, an income, and trained in construction techniques and other skills to start the process of rebuilding infrastructure and removing rubble; and small businesses are given start up grants, financing and other help to keep communities viable and functioning.

UNDP advisors also work with and train local public servants to make sure that the buildings, infrastructure and communities being reconstructed meet a minimal code of disaster resistance, and that where possible, the underlying triggers of a conflict or disaster are addressed.

UNDP’s immediate crisis response package:

Projects and Initiatives

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Responding to the Balkan Floods

In mid May 2014, a low pressure system referred to locally as Cyclone Tamara caused the heaviest rainfall in more than a century across much of the Balkan region. Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Serbia have been heavily affected by both flooding and over 3,000 landslides. Nearly 50 people have been killmore

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South Sudan: Strengthening civil service to continue vital support

For most people, moving to a new country to work can be full of surprises. But for Yenew Azale, a trained nurse from Ethiopia working in South Sudan, adjusting to a new job has included being evacuated because of intense fighting. “Not everything is as I had expected,” he says. “But I feel a great smore

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Afghanistan: Women gain access to clean water

Until recently, women in the village of Jukna, in the remote province of Badghis in western Afghanistan, used to walk four kilometres a day to collect drinking water for their families. And even then, the scarce, brackish water was often a health hazard. “The women used to collect water from uncovermore