Responding to the crisis in Gaza

By the end of August, more than 475,000 people had been displaced from their homes, unable to return to their destroyed neighbourhoods. The situation in Gaza is unusual as restrictions imposed on the territory’s borders have made it difficult for residents to flee to neighbouring countries. Most of the displaced families have sought shelter with relatives, while others are staying at temporary emergency shelters provided by the government and UNWRA. This is placing a strain on the services and livelihoods of host communities and further exacerbating poverty.

Highlights

  • By the end of August, more than 475,000 people had been displaced from their homes.
  • More than 2,100 people have been killed so far including over 1,400 civilians.
  • Unemployment, already higher than 60% due to the impact of the blockade, will continue to rise.

Besides the declining humanitarian situation, as with previous conflicts in Gaza, the violence will have significant long-term consequences for economic growth and development. The businesses, livelihoods and assets of hundreds of thousands of civilians have been affected. Unemployment, already higher than 60 percent due to the impact of the blockade, will continue to rise. Resources, such as food, medicine and cooking gas have been further depleted - and public utilities, such as electricity generation, as well as water and sewage treatment plants have been destroyed. At the same time, rubble and debris has rendered many streets inaccessible. The conflict has not only damaged community infrastructure, but has now made it impossible to provide education and health services in some areas.

UNDP is working with humanitarian agencies, national and international partners to urgently address these issues and help Gaza rebuild and recover.