Our Perspective

      • Innovating for the Rule of Law? | A. H. Monjurul Kabir

        25 Mar 2014

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        The 'My World, My Georgia' campaign used micro-narratives as a new way to collect and analyze data. Photo: UNDP in Georgia

        Law students and legal researchers from the University of Oxford asked me recently whether the rule of law agenda could be more innovative, and I do believe that we need a fundamental transformation in the way we do our rule of law and governance work at all levels. There are many barriers to accessing justice and ensuring rule of law, especially where there are high levels of poverty, exclusion, marginalization and insecurity. Laws and justice institutions – formal and informal – may be biased or discriminatory. Justice and security systems may be ineffective, slow, and untrustworthy. People may lack knowledge about their rights. There may be a culture of impunity for criminal acts. Despite all these, more can be done to ensure that the most vulnerable and disadvantaged groups benefit from rule of law, legal empowerment and access to justice, which expand their opportunities and choices. Doing more with less is the challenge here. Our traditional structures, systems and processes are proving inadequate to deal with new development challenges. Our justice system is not the most transparent or data-friendly and bringing information to light is no easy task. We are in need of new ideas, resources and unconventional ways of collecting and Read More

      • How to enhance the skills of girls, boys and youth | Martín Fuentes

        24 Mar 2014

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        The Human Development Report Panama highlighted a number of key socio-emotional skills that must be strengthened by parents and families Photo: UNDP Panama

        The 2014 Human Development Report Panama discusses early childhood, youth and formation of life skills. This report examines difficult themes, such as job training, family and education, and whether young people study and/or work. One obvious way to approach life skills in many countries in the region would be to focus on job training, either because the productive sectors require a permanent supply of qualified personnel or because a country is strongly committed to a knowledge-based economy. But concern about job training is important but short-sighted; it is more important to train people who are also motivated to work. Indeed, although applied skills are easier to learn, many employers recognize that it is more important to hire individuals who are creative and take initiative, difficult skills to learn. Therefore, it is important to provide good training in the basic skills of "learning how to learn,” — rather than having a wealth of information, it is more important to know what to look for and where, and to be capable of discerning what is relevant. However, beyond seeing training as basic building blocks with which to construct something more complex, there are a number of key socio-emotional skills that cannot be strengthened Read More

      • How can advocacy NGOs become more innovative? Your thoughts, please | Duncan Green

        19 Mar 2014

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        The manager of a milk-chilling centre in India, part of a collaboration between UNDP India and the IKEA Foundation launched in 2009 to help empower women socially, economically and politically. (Photo: Graham Crouch/UNDP)

        Innovation. Who could be against it? Not even Kim Jong Un, apparently. People working on aid and development spend an increasing time discussing it – what is it? How do we get more of it? Who is any good at it? Innovation Tourette’s is everywhere. Most of that discussion takes place in areas such as programming (what we do on the ground) or internal management (the unquenchable urge to restructure), drawing on innovation thinking in the private sector, government and academia. But another (increasingly important) area of our work – advocacy/influencing – feels a bit absent from the innovation circus, so I’ve been asked to crowdsource a few ideas. Help me out here. In advocacy, we see plenty of innovation already, in new themes (e.g. a range of tax campaigns in the wake of the financial crisis) and players (online outfits such as Avaaz and change.org). But we also see a fair amount of business as usual: the cycle of policy papers, recommendations, lobby meetings, media work and consultations grinds on, not always to great effect. At a higher level, there is lots of really innovative thinking going on about how to operate in complex systems, but that tends to be Read More