Sustainable Land Management

  • Agency Collaboration for UNCCD: Current Situation and Lessons LearnedAug 25, 2003Agency Collaboration for UNCCD: Current Situation and Lessons LearnedThis joint publication of the Facilitation Committee of the Global Mechanism for the UNCCD CoP-6, (25 Aug - 5 Sept 2003, Havana, Cuba), presents short briefs by Committee members highlighting their commitment to CCD process and its implementation. It provides some lessons learnt from collaboration between members through a matrix of successful collaborative efforts to date.

  • Nov 1, 2004Reclaiming the Land, Sustaining Livelihoods - Lessons for the Future 2004The brochure, part of UNDP/GEF's "Lessons for the Future" series, highlights examples of activities to combat land degradation. It focuses on "cross-cutting projects" that address land degradation but were primarily designed to deal with other environmental problems, and specific UNDP/GEF land degradation projects that seek to build capacity or foster SLM practices.

  • Delivering Results in Degraded Lands for People and PlanetOct 7, 2015Delivering Results in Degraded Lands for People and Planet

  • Environmental Justice - Comparative Experiences in Legal Empowerment Jun 12, 2014Environmental Justice - Comparative Experiences in Legal EmpowermentThis report outlines challenges and innovations arising around the world as communities and governments pursue an agenda of justice based on inclusive and sustainable use of natural resources and the environment. The paper highlights trends in strategies emerging across regions

  • The why and how of mainstreaming gender in Sustainable Land ManagementOct 16, 2007The why and how of mainstreaming gender in Sustainable Land ManagementAs part of UNDP's new series "Gender Mainstreaming: a Key Driver of Development in Environment & Energy," this guide looks at why gender is relevant to policymaking and programming in sustainable land management. It details how UNDP can strengthen the gender dimension of its work in sustainable land management at the policy level, as well as in project programming.

  • Challenge Paper: Poverty and the DrylandsSep 1, 2001Challenge Paper: Poverty and the DrylandsAs part of UNDP's Global Development Imperative Challenge Paper Series, this publication challenges the current wisdom on the distribution and condition of drylands populations and offers more realistic scenarios that decision-makers can take seriously. The paper sets out this challenge and introduces some of the new evidence that is required.

  • Mar 26, 2003Challenge Paper: Pastoralism and Mobility in the DrylandsThe paper notes that pastoralists have been ill-served by development policies due to myths and misunderstandings of pastoralism, which distort policy-making about pastoral livelihood systems. The paper outlines new policies to address the marginalization of pastoralists from mainstream society.

  • Preventing Land Degradation, Sustaining LivelihoodsAug 1, 2002Preventing Land Degradation, Sustaining LivelihoodsThe brochure, part of UNDP/GEF's "Lessons for the future" series, highlights examples of UNDP/GEF activities to combat land degradation in Morocco, the Caucasus, Senegal, Lesotho, Pakistan and Sudan. Approaches covered include empowering traditional pastoralists, conserving arid and semi-arid ecosystem, preserving biodiversity and landscapes, etc.

  • Oct 1, 2006Dryland futures: East and Southern Africa-Three critical factorsThe publication looks to the prospect for the East and Southern African drylands in the context of recent history and the changes that have occurred in the realms of policy, economic and social conditions and the environment. It further points out three of the biggest challenges facing East and Southern Africa in the foreseeable future— climate change, land tenure and HIV/AIDS.

  • Mother Earth: Women and sustainable land managementAug 31, 2007Mother Earth: Women and sustainable land managementThe publication provides practitioners and policy-makers with practical guidance on the mainstreaming of gender considerations in sustainable land management (SLM). It argues that such approaches will not only provide women with a platform to fully engage in development, but will also enhance the delivery of impacts and effectiveness of our interventions.