Featured publications

  • Fast Facts: Universal Energy AccessJul 1, 2011Some 1.4 billion people have no access to electricity and a billion more only have access to unreliable electricity networks. About 3 billion people rely on solid fuels (traditional biomass and coal) to meet their basic needs. Access to modern energy services for cooking and heating, lighting and communications, and mechanical power for productive uses is a vast area of unmet need. The energy access challenge is particularly acute in the least developed countries, South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.

  • Towards an 'Energy Plus' Approach for the Poor: A Review of Good Practices and Lessons Learned from Asia and the PacificJan 18, 2012Between 2009 and 2011, the UNDP Asia-Pacific Regional Centre led a collaborative review of 17 energy access programmes and projects implemented by governments, development agencies and the private sector in Asia-Pacific.

  • Sustainable Energy for All - Brief Guide to Advocacy PlanningSustainable Energy for All - Brief Guide to Advocacy PlanningAug 1, 2012The International Year of Sustainable Energy for All is a unique opportunity and platform to raise national public awareness and influence policies, commitments and action for the sustainable energy for all goal. This provides effective advocacy strategies on Sustainable Energy for All.

  • SEFA Advocacy PowerPoint PresentationSEFA Advocacy PowerPoint PresentationAug 1, 2012This presentation can be used for outreach and advocacy activities on Sustainable Energy for All.

  • World Energy Assessment: Energy and the Challenge of SustainabilityWorld Energy Assessment: Energy and the Challenge of SustainabilityDec 1, 2000The publication highlights the social, economic, environmental and security issues linked to energy. It analyzes how energy can serve as an instrument to reach the goal of sustainable human development. It concludes that the adoption of policies that encourage the delivery of energy services in cleaner and more efficient ways is a prerequisite to address development problems.

  • Smoke in the Kitchen: Health Impacts of Indoor Air PollutionSmoke in the Kitchen: Health Impacts of Indoor Air PollutionJun 6, 2006This is the executive summary of a seminar hosted by UNDP with support from ITDG, USEPA, and WTO. The aim of the seminar was to raise awareness among country governments and UN agencies on the health impacts of indoor air pollution from household energy use, and to promote global action to reduce people's exposure to this substantial environmental health risk.

  • Promotion of Wind Energy: Lessons Learned from UNDP-GEF ProjectsJun 1, 2008The report provides a review of the active UNDP-GEF wind energy portfolio. It looks at the design, costs and efficiency of existing projects, drawing on the experience of 14 wind energy projects that have been financed through UNDP to help national governments implement wind energy public policies.

  • FAQs: How Do Rural Energy Services Reduce Poverty?Mar 1, 2005The document is a compilation of frequently asked questions about the multifunctional platform (MFP). It contains information about the role of energy services in poverty reduction, linkage between rural energy services and MDGs, MFPs and MDGs, scaling up MFPs, and policy issues.

  • UNDP, UNEP, World Bank team up on Access to EnergyMay 10, 2007The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Bank expressed their commitment to strengthen cooperation on energy access, an important advance in the drive for more efficient and more effective support to poverty reduction and sustainable development.

  • Water Supply and Energy Services for the Poor: Rules Make MarketsMar 1, 2004The paper notes that deregulation and privatization in the water supply and energy sectors, as a means to stimulate private-sector investment, have only led to improved services for the poor when effective regulation mechanisms have been put in place by governments and public agencies. It proposes that strong regulatory agencies are needed to make markets work and address environmental objectives.

Fast Facts - Universal Energy Access

Universal access to modern energy services is achievable by 2030. There are no fundamental technical barriers, and proven and innovative solutions exist. The capital investment required for universal energy access represents only around 3 per cent of the total global energy investment. Governments must make universal energy access a top political priority. Practical, effective and large-scale actions are needed to invest in capacity development, mobilize public-private partnerships and massively scale up successful and innovative solutions to overcome extreme energy poverty.