Ecosystems and Biodiversity

  • MARES: Conserving Ocean Ecosystems and Safeguarding Coastal CommunitiesOct 1, 2009The objective of the Marine Ecosystem Services Program (MARES) is to protect crucial marine ecosystem services by harnessing markets and private sector investment. MARES focuses on four key areas: water quality, marine biodiversity, coastal and beach stabilization, and fish nurseries. The document provides a brief overview of the Program.

  • Biodiversity for Sustainable Development: Delivering Results for Asia and the PacificBiodiversity for Sustainable Development: Delivering Results for Asia and the PacificOct 14, 2014This book is both a celebration of biodiversity work in the Asia-Pacific region and a cautionary account of what is happening to the ecosystems that support millions of lives and livelihoods in the region.

  • Measuring Impacts of Sustainable Land ManagementJul 11, 2011The GEF-funded project ‘Ensuring Impacts from SLM - Development of a Global Indicator System’ (KM:Land), developed a suite of global and project-level indicators to measure global environmental benefits and local livelihood benefits. The indicators and accompanying conceptual framework are now being adopted and adapted by both the GEF and UNCCD in their efforts to measure impacts of their respective strategies to combat land degradation.

  • Combating Poaching and Wildlife TraffickingCombating Poaching and Wildlife TraffickingMar 2, 2015Wildlife trafficking is among the five most lucrative illegal trades globally, worth an estimated 23 billion USD annually. It is a multifaceted global threat that erodes biodiversity, ecosystems and creates insecurity that fuels conflict and corruption. Poaching and wildlife trafficking strip countries of their national assets, disrupt social cohesion, and undermine the rule of law.

  • UNDP's Work on Biodiversity ManagementUNDP's Work on Biodiversity ManagementFeb 1, 2010The brochure outlines UNDP's work on biodiversity management through two Signature Programmes: 1) Unleashing the economic potential of Protected Area systems and 2) Mainstreaming biodiversity management objectives into economic sector activities. It further highlights examples of UNDP's contributions towards the organization’s broader work on environment and sustainable development.

  • Fast Facts: Biodiversity and EcosystemsFast Facts: Biodiversity and EcosystemsOct 12, 2012Ecosystems, species and genes - the building blocks of biodiversity - are being degraded at an unparalleled rate as natural resources are exploited without consideration for their broader value to the ecosystem and economic values.

  • Linking Poverty Reduction and Environmental ManagementLinking Poverty Reduction and Environmental ManagementJul 30, 2002The report focuses on ways to reduce poverty and sustain growth by improving environmental management. It demonstrates that sound and equitable management of the environment is integral to achieving the MDGs, and argues for a coherent, focused framework for action, with clear goals and achievable targets backed up by adequate resources and effective and transparent monitoring mechanisms.

  • Making REDD work for the Poor - A PEP ReportOct 9, 2008The report presents a framework for understanding the linkages between Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) and poverty. It is the culmination of collaborative analysis and synthesis of the social dimensions of REDD. It presents 10 required conditions that will ensure that the implementation of REDD mechanisms yields benefits for the rural poor in developing countries.

  • Gender Dimensions of Intellectual Property and Traditional Medicinal KnowledgeApr 27, 2007The paper outlines the debates on intellectual property (IP) protection vis-à-vis other systems for protecting the communal nature of traditional medicinal plant knowledge. The paper uses a gender lens to understand how IP and trade policies affect disempowered peoples, particularly women and men whose livelihoods depend on the collection and harvesting of traditional medicines.

  • Realising REDD: Implications of Ghana’s Current Legal Framework for TreesOct 1, 2009The paper, by the Katoomba Group, provides a brief overview of REDD implications of Ghana’s legal framework for trees and associated benefit‐sharing mechanisms. It notes that the current legislative framework for forestry presents some problems and challenges that could impede implementation of REDD strategies in Ghana. The paper concludes with ways to address these challenges.

Fast Facts
Fast Facts: Biodiversity and Ecosystems

Human survival and wellbeing depend upon biodiversity and healthy ecosystems, and the goods and services they provide—such as food, medicines, crop pollination, filtration of pollutants, and protection from natural disasters. This contribution is neither fully recognized nor valued in markets.  As a result, ecosystems, species and genes—the building blocks of biodiversity—are being degraded at an unparalleled pace as natural resources are being exploited without consideration for their broader ecosystem and economic values. The poor, especially in rural areas, face the most severe impacts of such changes as they directly depend on ecosystem goods and services for their survival and wellbeing.