It’s time for a climate revolution. Can the Paris Agreement take us there?

01 Dec 2016 by Daniela Carrington, Climate Change Policy Advisor, UNDP Istanbul Regional Hub

It’s time for a climate revolution. Can the Paris Agreement take us there?The Paris Agreement on climate change represents a ground-breaking global accord. At the COP22 conference in Marrakesh, decision-makers moved to implement the deal. Photo:
A year ago, against all expectations, delegates in Paris agreed on a ground-breaking new deal to take action on global warming. In less than a year, the agreement came into force and was ratified by 113 nations, together accounting for 75 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions. It was unprecedented in the history of international agreements. At the COP22 climate conference in Marrakesh, decision-makers moved quickly to begin to implement the deal. Here are a few of the key results. … Read more

Ready, set, innovate!

28 Nov 2016 by Marc Lepage, Innovation and Knowledge Management Specialist, UNDP Regional Bureau for Africa

Photo: Aude Rossignol/UNDP Burundi
In Africa, as in the rest of the world, things are moving! We live in a world that is becoming more and more complex, whether it be in social, economic or political terms. With the introduction of the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), we now have to adapt and adjust our practices in order to achieve such goals both efficiently and effectively. It's not uncommon to hear partners or even staff members complain, rightfully or wrongfully, about the red tape involved when it comes to UNDP procedures. Time-consuming processes or administrative tasks have been put into place and seem sometimes to take precedence over the quality of our interventions. Innovation can help correct such dysfunctions and thus allow us to be more productive. So, how can we best define the term ‘innovate’? There are a lot of possibilities, but the one to bear in mind is the fact that innovation enables us to give full rein to the innate creativity that lies within us. It allows us to come up with original and powerful responses to meet specific societal needs – and such responses can be technological or organizational in structure, or even a leading factor in bringing about social or behavioural changes. … Read more

Here’s the bottom line: Gender equality profits business and society

18 Nov 2016 by Susan McDade, Deputy Director, Latin America and the Caribbean, UNDP

 Companies committed to women’s active participation achieve greater efficiency and better personnel performance, have more committed employees, and improve hiring and their public image. Photo: James A. Rodríguez/MiMundo.org
The 2030 Agenda gives us a road map to build the world we want, leaving no one behind. Gender equality is crucial to attaining the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), as well as a fundamental human right driving progress for all the other goals. Empowering women and girls has a multiplier effect and that contributes to promoting economic growth and development around the world. In partnership with the private sector and governments, we must work together to close gender gaps and eliminate structural barriers that impede women’s empowerment. There have already been some extraordinary advances. However, we still have a long way to go. Despite the increasing number of women engaging in paid work, on average, they earn 24 percent less than men. Women are also less likely to have access to decent work, property and formal credit. Labour force participation is also lower for women than for men. In 2015, 72 percent of working-age (15 and older) men were employed, compared with only 47 percent of women. Globally, women hold only 22 percent of senior leadership positions, and 32 percent of businesses have no female senior managers. The situation in Latin America and the Caribbean is not far from this reality. Women do 75 percent of the unpaid domestic work. Five of every 10 women are out of the labour market, and 54 percent work in informal environments, with fragile incomes and little social protection. Furthermore, among 72 large companies in the region, three have a woman as CEO or president; that’s just 4.2 percent. In this context, the private sector has a fundamental role to play in eliminating gender inequalities and fostering sustainable development. By implementing gender equality standards within their own companies, the private sector can ensure equal opportunities for women, create inclusive work environments and help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals focused on gender equality (Goal 5), decent work and economic growth (Goal 8), and reduced inequalities (Goal 10). … Read more

Health and well-being for the world’s poor: Making the case for tobacco taxation

11 Nov 2016 by Mandeep Dhaliwal, Director, HIV, Health and Development Group, Bureau for Policy and Programme Support and Roy Small, Health and Innovative Financing Consultant, UNDP

Health and well-being for the world’s poor: Making the case for tobacco taxationTaxation on tobacco has emerged as a proven intervention in rich and poor countries alike to improve health while simultaneously financing development priorities. UN Photo/Martine Perret
Tobacco taxes have emerged as a proven gold standard intervention to stem the rising tide of health and development challenges. … Read more

Integration and the 2030 Agenda – what does it really mean?

10 Nov 2016 by By Pedro Conceiçao, Director of Strategic Policy, UNDP Bureau for Policy and Programme Support , Diana Alarcón, Chief, Development Strategy and Policy Unit, UNDESA and Mark Howells, Director, Division of Energy Systems Analysis, Royal Institute of Technology

With its twin emphasis on people and planet, the 2030 Agenda demands an integrated approach to development policy. Photo: Albert Gonzalez Farran/UNDP
Perhaps no other word has been repeated more frequently than “integrated” to describe the 2030 Agenda and its Sustainable Development Goals. Yet policymaking is approached sector-by-sector. The allocation of resources and the political accountability at the national level lie with sectoral ministries. So what does “integration” mean for national policymaking in the context of the 2030 Agenda? Does an integrated perspective really lead to any changes in policy decisions? Let us consider an example. In the island of Mauritius, sugarcane plantations cover 80 percent to 90 percent of cultivated land. The sugar business has been an important contributor to the economy and a key source of export and foreign exchange earnings. Mauritian sugar exporters have, however, recently lost the preferential access to the EU market. The question has therefore been raised whether it would be in the national interest to promote a local biofuel industry to make use of the sugarcane. Reduced imports costs of petroleum and coal would liberate resources for social and other investments, improve energy independence and reduce greenhouse gases emissions. … Read more

Drivers of public services and policies of tomorrow – the role of government innovation labs

12 Oct 2016 by Benjamin Kumpf, Policy Specialist, Innovation at UNDP and Laura Schnurr, Social Enterprise and Social Finance, Canadian Government and Innovation Facility, UNDP.

Kolba Lab, run by UNDP and the government of Armenia, held a mapathon of accessible places in Yerevan. Photo: @gorkroyan
What comes to mind when you hear the term ‘innovation’? The public sector? – Thought not. But we are working on changing this. Over the last three years, UNDP has set up innovation labs in five countries to support governments in designing the next generation of public services and to embark on experimental policy-design and another one is being set up right now. From Brazil, Colombia and Canada to South Africa, Israel, Malaysia and Singapore – the world map of labs is constantly growing. Government innovation labs, sometimes referred to as change labs, social labs or design labs, have been opening up in more and more places since the early 2000s. What are Public Sector innovation labs and how do they work? Government or public sector innovation labs are teams that combine expertise in innovation methods and public sector reform to improve policy design and the way governments deliver services to the public. Another important role of the labs is to help governments reframe challenges and to broaden the perspective of policy makers by bringing in the perspective of users. Labs help governments in creating better solutions based on citizen feedback and inputs. But ideally they are more than quick-solution delivery machines. … Read more

Leaving no one behind means confronting ageism in development

30 Sep 2016 by Cailin Crockett, Gender Specialist, Bureau for Policy and Programme Support

India socially excludedThe number of people aged 60 and above is expected to reach 1.4 billion in 2030 and 2 billion in 2050— with the majority living in low- and middle-income countries. Photo: UNDP Asia Pacific
Every year on 1 October, the United Nations observes the International Day of Older Persons. This year the Day is devoted to taking a stand against ageism, the systemic stereotyping and discrimination against people because they are considered old. Fortunately, with the adoption of the 2030 Agenda, the invisibility of older persons in international development programmes and policies is finally being addressed. Although the international community officially recognized the harmful consequences of ageism as a matter of human rights in 2014, the Millennium Development Goals made no mention of older persons or population ageing. It has only been through the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the 2030 Agenda’s commitment to “leave no one behind” that older persons have been explicitly included in global development policy agreed to by all Member States. Why the shift? Demographics alone warrant increased attention to ageing populations. The number of people aged 60 and above is expected to reach 1.4 billion in 2030 and 2 billion in 2050— with the majority living in low- and middle-income countries. Gender equality goals, in SDG 5 and integrated throughout the 2030 Agenda, also compel us to finally recognize and remedy the scope of gender disparities throughout the life span and strategically include older women in this agenda. … Read more

Social Good Summit: From an idea among friends to a global movement

16 Sep 2016 by Boaz Paldi, Engagement Manager, UNDP

SGS ChinaThe Social Good Summit brings together global leaders, technology experts and grassroots activists to discuss solutions for the greatest challenges of our time. UNDP photo
When a group of inspired citizens got together seven years ago, asking themselves the question “what if we could have an open, transparent gathering, during UN Week – a real Peoples' Summit?” they could not have possibly imagined where the answer to that question would lead them. I was lucky enough to be present to witness the start of this global movement and have seen it grow over the past seven years. It has been quite a ride, to say the least. We saw US ex-presidents, current vice-presidents, rock stars, scientists, global grassroots leaders. We saw new inventions and innovations for social impact. We saw a worldwide conversation with millions of participants and billions of messages. The list goes on and on. … Read more

Making natural resource revenue sharing work

10 Sep 2016 by Andrew Bauer, Senior Economic Analyst, Natural Resource Governance Institute , Uyanga Gankhuyag, Economist, UNDP and Sofi Halling, Policy Analyst, Extractive Industries, UNDP

Revenue sharing systems can compensate producing regions for environmental damage associated with mineral extraction. Photo: UNDP
Despite a peace agreement signed last year, Libya remains embroiled in violent conflict. At the heart of the conflict is oil, which accounts for more than 90 percent of government revenue. The vast majority is produced in the country’s east and south, while the commercial and administrative capital, Tripoli, is in the west. Just like in other parts of the world suffering from natural resource-fueled conflicts, disagreements over how national and subnational authorities should share the revenues from non-renewable resources are threatening the nation’s stability and future. Natural resource revenue sharing—the legal right of different regions to either directly collect some taxes from oil or mining companies or for the central government to distribute resource revenues to different regions according to a formula—has been proposed as one means of ending the Libyan war. Beyond their potential for bringing peace, revenue sharing systems can compensate producing regions for environmental damage and loss of livelihoods associated with oil, gas and mineral extraction. They can also serve as an acknowledgement of local claims over resource wealth, even in regions without conflict. … Read more

The time is now for collective action on migration and displacement

01 Sep 2016 by Owen Shumba, Team Leader, Livelihoods and Economic Recovery

The world counts over 40 million internally displaced people and over 25 million refugees. Photo: UNDP
Migration. Refugees. Internally Displaced Persons. Migrants. Immigrants. Asylum seekers. Host communities. These have become familiar words in our language. Familiar tools in our politics. Yet for millions of people it is a lived experience of human development, responsibility, human tragedy, poverty, conflict, missed opportunities, and more. Left unattended it will devastate future generations. The coming decade will test our resolve to end hunger, poverty, conflicts, reduce disaster risks as well as build lasting peace. The 2030 Agenda has created a foundation for the global community to succeed in this endeavour … Read more