Humanitarian action makes sound business sense

31 May 2016 by Marcos Neto, Director, Istanbul International Center for Private Sector in Development

Private sector, individual companies and philanthropic actors support humanitarian action and development in many countries. Photo: UNCT
In February, Tropical Cyclone Winston hit Fiji, resulting in loss of life, disruption to business supply chains and damage to properties. The estimated cost to the Fijian economy was US$470 million. Imagine the even greater impact to the Philippines, which is visited by an average of 20 typhoons every year, five of which are destructive. The challenges the world is facing right now are overwhelming. More than 130 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance in the world today. Some 60 million people have been forcibly displaced. UN-coordinated plans to provide life-saving aid and protection to the most vulnerable people require nearly US$21 billion each year. … Read more

Make it your business: 7 steps to make your business and community better

14 Apr 2016 by Roy Trivedy, UN Resident Coordinator and UNDP Resident Representative in Papua New Guinea and Assel Tleof, Communications Specialist at UNDP Papua New Guinea

people in trainingNational stakeholders receive expert training to promote sustainable development in Papua New Guinea. Photo: UNDP Papua New Guinea
2016 is a momentous year for change worldwide. It can be pivotal year for us to turn the tide and act on the major social, economic and environmental issues we face. As leaders in business, how can companies best contribute to positive social impact and help countries achieve development? The new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) can be a starting point. Businesses around the world are already starting to focus on the SDGs that are most relevant to their businesses goals and embedding them in their operations. And they are finding it to be commercially beneficial. So as a business leader, where might you begin? … Read more

A legacy of private sector engagement for sustainable development

07 Mar 2016 by Marcos Neto, Director, Istanbul International Center for Private Sector in Development

people around a tableFor 50 years, UNDP has worked with the private sector to create jobs, establish value chains and build infrastructure. Photo: BUTGEM
As the engine of growth in most developing and developed countries, the private sector contributes to poverty reduction indirectly by creating aggregate income and wealth, and directly by generating employment and providing affordable goods and services. For 50 years, UNDP has worked with the private sector and in collaboration with national governments, to create jobs, establish value chains, build infrastructure and forge public policy and regulation that advance both national goals and the global development agenda. … Read more

How can mining contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals?

05 Oct 2015 by Gillian Davidson, Lisa Sachs and Casper Sonesson

A miner in DRC.A worker at a mine in the Democratic Republic of Congo. With meaningful engagement, mining companies could become partners in achieving the SDGs. UNDP Photo
The heads of 193 UN member states have now signed on to a set of 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which will be the shared global development framework for the coming generation. Mining companies have the potential to become leading partners in achieving the SDGs. Through their direct operations, mining companies can generate profits, employment, and economic growth in low-income countries. And through partnerships with government and civil society, they can ensure that benefits of mining extend beyond the life of the mine itself, so that the mining industry has a positive impact on the natural environment, climate change, and social capital. … Read more

"Impact investing" benefits business, people and planet

28 May 2015 by Priscilla Sani-Chimwele, Programme Analyst, Private Sector Development and Engagement

Big players are already engaging heavily in various impact investment ventures in various parts of the globe. Photo: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Some say that the most critical aspect of a successful business is the customer. I would agree: A business that contributes to the wellbeing and affluence of its customers by giving back ensures that in the long run they are able to afford and continue to consume the goods and services that the business provides. In this blog series, our experts share their thoughts on key financing for development issues. … Read more

What role for the private sector in financing the new sustainable development agenda?

07 May 2015 by By Marcos Athias Neto and Massimiliano Riva

Phasing out fossil fuels is one way to reduce investment in areas that can be harmful to the SDGs. Photo: UNDP in Somalia
The contribution the private sector can make through innovation, agility, ingenuity and financial resources can be better appreciated and maximized. In this blog series, our experts share their thoughts on key financing for development issues … Read more

Involving the private sector in managing climate change and disasters

26 Feb 2015 by Moortaza Jiwanji, Programme Manager for the Pacific Risk Resilience Programme (PRRP) at UNDP Pacific Centre

Vanuatu coastlineLike most small island nations, Vanuatu's coastal zone is the country’s hub of economic activity. In order to protect the economies of small islands, it is imperative to enhance the adaptive capacity of coastal zones. Photo: UNDP
In January 2014, I was in Tonga working with the Government on recovery efforts following Tropical Cyclone Ian. While there, I heard about Digicel’s interest in supporting the recovery effort at the community level. This piqued my interest about the prospects for Private Public Partnerships (PPPs) and how they could work in the Pacific around the topic of Climate Change and Disaster Risk Management (CCDRM). Why don’t governments and development partners work more closely with private sector? Why aren’t such working arrangements part of everyday business? The impacts of climate change and disasters are ultimately development issues – and managing them should involve the public and private sectors, as well as communities. I started a dialogue with Digicel in their regional office in Fiji. At first it was challenging; it was as though we spoke different languages. However, after our second meeting with Digicel’s team in Suva and their colleagues in Vanuatu, it became very clear that we wanted the same things. We not only shared common goals, but those goals were surprisingly simple to achieve. I realized that the private sector could offer governments a far more cost-effective way of raising the awareness of remote island communities about the threat of cyclones. … Read more

Innovative public-private partnerships are key to Post-2015 success

13 Feb 2015 by Neil Buhne, Director of UNDP's Geneva Liaison Office

 Kazakhstan produces 343,000 tonnes of electronic waste each year. Through a public-private partnership the country is now making positive changes to their e-waste disposal. Photo: UNDP Kazakhstan making changes to e-waste disposal through an unusual public-private partnership
In this blog series, UNDP experts and practitioners share their experiences and views on innovation in development practice. In a world where links between countries are greater and faster than ever, disasters that once might have had only local effects now increasingly have international ramifications. The effects from the tsunami/meltdown of Japan’s Fukushima reactor, for example, had devastating local consequences, but also impacted communities and economies thousands of miles away. In such an interconnected world, with impacts that touch upon all of society, locally and internationally, we need equally all-embracing approaches. While challenging, an increasingly interlinked world also provides unprecedented opportunities to reduce risk. Countries that might have once been at a dire disadvantage from a skills and knowledge perspective now have the ability to draw upon international resources. And the private sector—which operates in perhaps an even more hyper-connected environment than governments—can be called on to provide expertise. Our goal then, as we move into the post-2015 context, is to learn how to tap into these areas and to make use of innovative partnerships that draw on specific strengths and address identifiable gaps. The Get Airports Ready for Disasters (GARD) programme, a joint venture between UNDP and Deutsche Post DHL, … Read more

Infrastructure for Development: Show me the Money!

10 Feb 2015 by Magdy Martínez-Solimán, Director, Bureau for Policy and Programme Support

Solar panels in GazaA Renewable energy generation project, implemented by UNDP and funded by the OPEC Fund for International Development (OFID), installed solar panels in schools and maternity clinics in Gaza. Photo: UNDP/PAPP
According to the Oxford University Said Business School, we are facing an unprecedented infrastructure mega-project investment era, amounting to 6-9 trillion US$ annually, or 8% of the global GDP. Whether it involves revamping old infrastructure, developing new sources of energy, providing access to social services and utilities to more people (with the paradigm of universal access in sight) or developing our communications infrastructure, it is easy to be in favour of more, and better, infrastructural development. The issue is not for poor countries alone to struggle with. President Obama wants to upgrade the US roads, bridges and ports by imposing new taxes on overseas earnings by American companies. Little can be said against infrastructure as a public good. The problem is how to interest private finance in that public good.       As the Secretary-General said in his post-2015 agenda Synthesis Report last December, “Urgent action is needed to mobilise, redirect, and unlock the transformative power of trillions of dollars of private resources to deliver on sustainable development objectives.” Infrastructure makes life better, economies more competitive, and while being built, offers jobs to the value chain. On the other side, however, infrastructure also massively consumes cement and increases emissions. It is one … Read more

Shared commitment and collective action are key in fighting corruption

14 Nov 2014 by Magdy Martínez-Solimán, Director, Bureau for Policy and Programme Support

participants of anti-corruption campaignUNDP in Sudan Organized a Drawing Contest with the Faculty of Fine and Applied Art, University of Sudan as part of an Anti-corruption campaign. Photo credit: UNDP/Sudan
This is a call to action, a call against a cancer, a call for health and a call for integrity. In the fight against corruption, everyone has a stake. Businesses, large and small, require an enabling environment to support growth, jobs, trade, and innovation. Only bad business thrives in an atmosphere of traffic of influence, access to privileged information and widespread bribery. That’s the businesses afraid to compete because they can’t win fair and square against the competition. All other businesses, the medium enterprises, the startups, the big ones, the innovators, those who play by the rules need a state to enforce such rules. So the question is: are you afraid to compete or are you happy to play the integrity game? In the midst of increasing pressures on public budgets striving to meet growing demand for more and better public services, the private sector presents models that are tremendously helpful to the public administration. The corporate world brings not only investment finance and capital but also normative frameworks, expertise and knowledge to the fight against corruption. Yet, despite progress, corruption continues to be a major challenge for companies operating both in developed and developing countries. According to the Institute of … Read more