Moldova’s innovation hub: Changing the way we police

28 Oct 2014 by Alex Oprunenco, Cristina Lisii and Alexandru Cocirta

People and police working with a board during the workshop. Police officers and community members discuss the design of the new space. Photo: UNDP in Moldova.
In June this year we launched our Innovation Facility  with generous support from the Government of Denmark. The initiatives we fund involve end users as designers of solutions which are put directly to the test in various countries across the world. For example, in Chișinău, Moldova’s capital, the renovation of a dilapidated Soviet-era police station was done differently - involving the community throughout the process. Our office in Moldova, partnering with the municipal police, FutureGov  and Studio TILT, quickly realized that changing the dynamics of a space involved more than just constructing a room and moving around some furniture. They considered questions such as: Can we create a space that makes the police more efficient, accessible, and trustworthy? What about the community? Can we make them feel happier, helpful, and more secure? Here’s how they did it Day 1:  Understanding the needs The first day was critical to change the police officers’ perception. We spent it learning about their daily issues, observing the constraints of the physical environment, and looking for possibilities for improvement. Day 2: Bringing in the community members We went to local markets and the police station to get the citizens’ point of view:  their perceptions of the police and … Read more

Loud and clear: Rethinking service design in Georgia

24 Oct 2014 by Sophie Tchitchinadze, Communications Analyst, UNDP Georgia

woman at a workshop in GeorgiaPeople living with speech or hearing impairments now have more options to contact the emergency hotline. Photo: David Khizanishvili, UNDP Georgia.
On the heels of SHIFT, UNDP's Week of Innovation Action, we tried to answer some basic questions: Why do we need it all? Why should we do innovation work in development? We got our answers after a design thinking session with the national emergency hotline in Georgia.  112 is one of the most dialled phone numbers in Georgia. In 2013 alone, they received over 8 million calls. Their website lists emergency services available for children, with a video tour, and frequently asked questions for those who may need immediate help. They provide everything for everyone – except for those who cannot hear or speak.  This is because 112 is only reachable through a voice call. Those living with speech or hearing impairments simply don’t have options. To change this, 112 teamed up with our office in Georgia and the Swedish Government  to prepare a new service design – one that would be truly universal. Earlier this year, the 112 team travelled to Ireland to examine how new technology can make emergency services more accessible for the hearing and speech impaired. This was followed by a three-day design thinking workshop that brought together people with disabilities, tech specialists and civil society organizations. … Read more

Public service isn't simple, but it matters

12 Jun 2014 by Max Everest-Phillips, Director, Global Centre for Public Service Excellence

First national disaster observatory in ArmeniaArmenia established its first National Disaster Observatory for the systematic collection, analysis and interpretation of disaster data. Photo: UNDP Armenia
UNDP Administrator Helen Clark really did the organization proud during her visit to Singapore recently. She clearly and crisply outlined to the World Cities Summit why the work of the Global Centre for Public Service Excellence (GCPSE) matters. So what’s our message? It is this: If there is still anyone who is searching for simple blueprints, handy toolkits, easy answers or quick fixes to the challenges public service faces everywhere, forget it. It’s just too complex. But don’t give up just yet! We might know a few other things, too. First, we know that if your top politicians and top officials don’t collaborate, nothing is going to happen. So sort that out.  Second, before you start on about how the public service has to do this or that, ask yourself, why are they going to bother? What’s in it for them? Are they strongly motivated? Recall, too, that public service is much more than just “delivery.” The legitimacy on which government depends is in no small measure the outcome of trust in public service. So public administration has a profound importance. Citizens' perceptions of ethics in public service shape satisfaction with services, trust in governmental institutions, and citizens' attitudes to politics … Read more