6 Develop a global partnership for development

What is the current situation in the world?

There is less aid money overall, with the poorest countries most adversely affected.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is the current situation in Turkey?

Developing global partnerships is crucial for poverty reduction and sustainable development. This involves developing a non-discriminatory trading and financial system thus answering the special needs of the least developed countries.

Starting from early 1980s, Turkey embarked on an intense reform process towards a more outward-oriented economic development strategy.

Reforms were made in all three public, financial and private sectors. Turkey is among the fastest growing countries in the world.

Turkey has also provided significant assistance to CIS countries and other countries in the region. Turkish Cooperation and Coordination Agency (TİKA) that provides technical assistance to new independent countries for their economic and social progress completed 2956 financial and technical assistance projects during 1992-2008.

The Turkish private sector also has a lot of direct investments in many developing countries. According to TİKA, official development assistance from Turkey has reached to 1,273 billion USD in 2011 which was 85 million USD in 2002.

1.7 years
remaining
until 2015

1990 2015
Quick facts
  • Official development assistance stood at $ 126 billion in 2012.
  • Eighty-three per cent of least developed country exports enter developed countries duty free
  • The debt service of developing countries consumes only 3 per cent of their export revenues.
  • In the developing world, 31 per cent of the population use the Internet compared to 77 percent of the developed world

Source: 2013 Millennium Development Goals report

Targets for MDG8
  1. Develop further an open, rule-based, predictable, non-discriminatory trading and financial system
    • Developing countries gain greater access to the markets of developed countries
    • Least developed countries benefit most from tariff reductions, especially on their agricultural products
  2. Address the special needs of least developed countries
    • Net Official development assistance (ODA), total and to the least developed countries, as percentage of OECD/DAC donors' gross national income
    • Proportion of total bilateral, sector-allocable ODA of OECD/DAC donors to basic social services (basic education, primary health care, nutrition, safe water and sanitation)
    • Proportion of bilateral official development assistance of OECD/DAC donors that is untied
    • Market access
    • Debt sustainability
  3. Address the special needs of landlocked developing countries and small island developing States
    • Official development assistance (ODA) received in landlocked developing countries as a proportion of their gross national income
    • ODA received in small island developing States as a proportion of their gross national incomes
    • Proportion of bilateral official development assistance of OECD/DAC donors that is untied
    • Market access
    • Debt sustainability
  4. Deal comprehensively with the debt problems of developing countries
    • Total number of countries that have reached their HIPC decision points and number that have reached their HIPC completion points (cumulative)
    • Debt relief committed under HIPC and MDRI Initiatives
    • Debt service as a percentage of exports of goods and services
  5. In cooperation with pharmaceutical companies, provide access to affordable essential drugs in developing countries
    • Proportion of population with access to affordable essential drugs on a sustainable basis
  6. In cooperation with the private sector, make available the benefits of new technologies, especially information and communications
    • Telephone lines per 100 population
    • Cellular subscribers per 100 population
    • Internet users per 100 population