About us

The UNDP Seoul Policy Centre for Global Development Partnerships is part of the United Nations’ global development and knowledge network. We advocate for change and connect countries to knowledge, experience and resources to help people build better lives.

The UNDP Seoul Policy Centre began its work in January 2011. It is the new form of cooperation between the Republic of Korea and UNDP to promote global development and knowledge for poverty reduction and sustainable human development, following almost five decades of successful joint work on Korea’s development.

The Centre:

  • Is a knowledge hub for cutting edge development research, policy dialogue, publications and knowledge sharing, in particular through South-South and triangular cooperation.
  • Builds bridges between Korea, new development partners and developing nations on key development issues and contributes to building capacity in developing countries.
  • Helps to capture and share Korea’s development experience with other countries.

Our Director

 

Balázs Horváth took up his post as Director of the UNDP Seoul Policy Centre in June 2016.

Prior to joining the Centre, he served as the Country Director in UNDP's South Sudan Country Office since 2012. Prior to that, he worked in the Europe and CIS Regional Center of UNDP as Poverty Reduction Practice Leader, then as Acting Director. This followed 18 years in various positions in the International Monetary Fund. He has dealt with diverse aspects of economic policy and complex development situations, including poverty and inequality reduction, social programmes, global climate change, good governance and rule of law. He is an experienced leader with a strong analytical economic and development background and has a compelling record in management and resource mobilization. He was the lead author of flagship publications on Human Development, on MDGs and Sustainable Development, and well-received papers on the impact of global crises on human development, on the role of governance in development, and on the causes of South Sudan’s crisis. Balázs is Hungarian, speaks English, Russian and German, and holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Pennsylvania.