UN’s hands-on experience for youths from marginalized groups propels many to success

UN Trainee Wahida Shah
UN Trainee Wahida Shah. Photo: Tapa Dipti Sitaula, UNDP Nepal

When Ranjana Bishwokarma came to Kathmandu from Dhanusa in 2004 for further studies, she hoped to one day become a Management specialist. Today, she is one step closer to her dream.  She is one of the 29 trainees who have been selected this year to take part in an 11-month long traineeship program with the United Nations in Nepal.

Ranjana is assigned to work with UNDP’s Human Resource Unit where she is gaining hands-on experience to build her competence in her desired field of work.

Highlights:

  • So far fifty three trainees have graduated from the previous two cohorts. Out of 29 trainees in the first batch from 2011, 14 of them have found employment. Three of them have even been hired by UN agencies.
  • The programme began in 2011 to enhance professional skills and competencies of people from socially excluded groups. There are 16 female trainees in the third cohort.

“This is my first big break towards becoming a specialist in the area of human resource management,” said a visibly excited Ranjana.

The new batch of trainees are part of the third cohort. The programme began in 2011 to enhance professional skills and competencies of people from socially excluded groups. There are 16 female trainees in the third cohort.

After passing through a rigorous selection process, the trainees are paired up with a mentor in their chosen field of work with different UN agencies for 11-month. During this period, they get practical experience and advice to advance their careers—picking up new skills by working hands-on in a professional setup.

So far fifty three trainees have graduated from the previous two cohorts. Out of 29 trainees in the first batch from 2011, 14 of them have found employment. Three of them have even been hired by UN agencies.

For Wahida Shah, a mother of two, the trainesship programme has provided a much needed opportunity to jumpstart her professional career. She entered into wedlock when she was 20. That meant that for 9 consecutive years she had little time to think about professional career. “I feel I can reach my destination if I struggled through the hardships”, she said, explaining how support from her husband and family, and the UN Joint Traineeship Programme, have enabled her to restart her career.

Yuwaraj Chemjong comes from the hills of Panchthar district in eastern Nepal. He is happy to be working with International Organization of Migraion (IOM) where he is working with the organization’s health career. He is optimistic about his future.

Traditionally youths of marginalized groups have had fewer opportunities for professional growth and the joint UN programme seeks to bridge that gap.