UNDP reduces expenses on drinking water by 60%


UNDP Lebanon - Distribution of drinking water to Syrian refugees in Wadi Khaled

Wadi Khaled, one of the poorest villages in Northern Lebanon, does not have a sufficient water supply for its populations. With the rise in the numbers of Syrian refugees (8000) in Wadi Khaled, the need indeed grew for water.

 

The United Nations Development Programme, under the Project “Support for Lebanese Communities Affected by the Syrian Crisis”, collaborated with the Wadi Khaled municipalities in order to achieve an efficient system for water supply and distribution.The UNDP supplied the municipality of Wadi Khaled with a tractor that collects water to distribute to inhabitants. Presently, the municipalities pay 10 000 LL per tank whereas it used to cost them 25 000 LL before UNDP’s involvement.

Highlights

  • The UNDP supplied the municipality of Wadi Khaled with a tractor that collects water to distribute to inhabitants.
  • The long-term advantages of this strategy are the decrease of diseases, and the reduced expenses on drinking water (by 60%).

 

The Head of Municipalities, Noureddine el Ahmad stated that the benefiters extended from Wadi Khaled to the villages of Amayer, Rejb Issa, and El Hij. The process is at work 24 hours a day. Those benefitting of this water supply are 25000 including Syrian refugeesThe long-term advantages of this strategy are the decrease of diseases, and the reduced expenses on drinking water (by 60%).

 

The Municipalities are now facing more responsibilities to develop tools for these water facilities, and to encompass infrastructure management. This strategy has proved to be an effective model to implement in other regions.Mr Bassam Mahamid, Hicha Municipality Chief states that the Syrians did not have access to sanitary water but the municipality is working on this issue in case of any funds received for this cause.

 

With the assistance of the UNDP, every family is now saving 60 000 LL per month. The positive consequences include fewer diseases, thus less health expenses, and an eventual sanitary environment.