In-depth

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before and after Saving the coral – Corals planted on a damaged rock at the Marine Park in which corals used to live on from al Dirrah bay in Aqaba Jordan

Jordan suffers from a severe water scarcity problem. According to the Water Strategy for the period of 2008-2022, the country is one of the four driest in the world.

Despite the Government efforts in managing the limited water resources and its relentless search for alternative supply, the available water resources per capita are falling as a result of population growth.

The scarcity of water in Jordan is the single most important constrain to the country growth and development as water is not only considered a factor for food production but a very crucial factor of health, survival and social and economical Development.

It is projected that the population will continue to grow from about 6.5 million in the year 2013 to over 7.8 million by the year 2022. Annual per capita water availability has declined from 3600 m3/year in the year 1946 to 145 m3/year in the year 2008; this is far below the international water poverty line of 500 m3/year.

Jordan has extremely limited primary energy resources and is forced to depend to a large extent on the imported petroleum, petroleum products and natural gas from neighboring Arab countries.

Due to economic growth and increasing population, energy demand is expected to rise by at least 50 percent over the next 20 years. The provision of reliable energy supply at reasonable cost is thus a crucial element of economic reform and sustainable development. Although the demand will be increasing, however, the dependency on conventional oil sources is expected to decrease.

Primary energy consumption reached 7.187 million toe in the year 2006, compared with 5.1 million in the year 2001, reflecting an overall growth of almost 40 percent. Over the same period, consumption of renewable energy has increased by a similar rate, growing from 76,000 toe in the year 2001 to 83,000 toe in the year 2005 and 111,000 toe in the year 2006.

The sustainability of human development in Jordan is dependent on the availability of secure, adequate and clean energy sources and threatened by the decline in both the quantity and quality of water resources; and degradation in the quality and availability of arable land due to urbanization and poor land-use policies. 

Due to its strategic location among three continents; Jordan treasure astonishing biological diversity, including terrestrial, wetland and marine ecosystems. The country has diverse topography, considerable climatic variations, and several habitat types. Biodiversity in Jordan was exposed to several threats and these have led to sharp decline in most of the Jordanian flora and fauna and extinction of several species.

To address these challenges that threaten sustainable efforts in Jordan; the Government in the year 2005 developed a national agenda; an action plan for achieving sustainable development through a programme of reforms in prevailing policies and practices.

Due to its strategic location among three continents; Jordan treasure astonishing biological diversity, including terrestrial, wetland and marine ecosystems. The country has diverse topography, considerable climatic variations, and several habitat types. Biodiversity in Jordan was exposed to several threats and these have led to sharp decline in most of the Jordanian flora and fauna and extinction of several species.

 

Our Goals

UNDP strengths national capacity to support sustainable, low-carbon, climate-resilient development biodiversity conservation, water scarcity with a focus on women.

UNDP assists the country in its transition to a low carbon economy and adaption of clean energy expansion including its choices of energy efficiency and renewable energy.

The support includes development of a National Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) and a plan for the phased introduction of low-emission technologies, that encompass socio-economic aspects by improving the livelihoods of poor people.

UNDP carries out studies to analyse the removal of regulatory barriers that sustain fossil fuel use, cost benefit analysis of clean technology options, and on how to stimulate business innovation and private sector participation for selected clean energy options.

With its partners, UNDP enhances the development and adoption of green building codes and assists in setting up mechanism in governorates to enforce these codes.

In order to reduce the potential negative impacts and build climate-resilient communities, efforts are being made to strengthen the Country’s climate change adaptation capabilities, through development and implementation of a gender sensitive climate change national action plan.

Facts & Figures

  • Only 4% of Jordan land is arable and less than 1% is forest and woodland

  • The total number of plant species recorded in Jordan exceeds 2500 species of which 100 are endemic and 485 species of medicinal plants

  • According to the IUCN Red List of 2006, Jordan has 47 globally
    threatened species. Of the 78 species and sub-species of mammals in Jordan, comprising 24 genera and 7 orders, 12 species are considered as globally threatened

  • It is projected that the population will continue to grow from about 6.5 million in the year 2013 to over 7.8 million by the year 2022. Annual per capita water availability has declined from 3600 m3/year in the year 1946 to 145 m3/year in the year 2008; this is far below the international water poverty line of 500 m3/year

  • Primary energy consumption reached 7.187 million toe in the year 2006, compared with 5.1 million in the year 2001, reflecting an overall growth of almost 40 percent. Over the same period, consumption of renewable energy has increased by a similar rate, growing from 76,000 toe in the year 2001 to 83,000 toe in the year 2005 and 111,000 toe in the year 2006.