Mainstreaming Conservation and Sustainable use of Medicinal Plant Diversity in Three Indian States

What is the Project About

What is the Project About
Photo: Centre for Aromatic Plants

In partnership with the Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India, the project seeks to promote long-term conservation and sustainable use of India’s medicinal plants through forest management policy and practice at national, state and local levels.

What Have We Accomplished So Far

What Have We Accomplished So Far
  • Mainstreaming Medicinal Plants in Policy and Protocol

    • Development of policy on medicinal plants
      A national-level draft policy and strategy on conservation and sustainable use of MPs, along with two state-level draft policies for Arunachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand prepared and ready for consideration by the governments

    •  Preservation of Traditional knowledge through People’s Biodiversity Registers and access and benefit sharing (ABS)
      The Danus and Takulis of Jhuni in Uttarakhand, the Baigas Traditional Healers’ Community of Chhattisgarh, and the Monpas of Arunachal Pradesh prepared BCPs that were released at the 2nd meeting of the Inter-governmental Committee on the Nagoya Protocol held in New Delhi on 2 July 2012

    • Sustainable harvest protocols
      Protocols based on a mix of traditional and scientific collection practices developed for 12 key species; and over 40 community members and forest officers trained in these protocols

  • Developing Practices of Conservation and Sustainable Use

    • Rapid threat assessment:
      Nineteen species identified as threatened through CAMP exercises held in the three project states; 14 of which were assessed as Critically Endangered

    • Landscape-based approach: Medicinal Plant Development Areas (MPDAs) 
      Twenty-one MPDAs currently cover 32,000 hectares across three project states

    • Ex-situ conservation: Home herbal gardens
      Over 12,000 home herbal gardens set up in Chhattisgarh with the help of the Traditional Healers Association

    • Capacity building
      Expert consultations held to revise the curriculum of the Indian Forest Service and state-level forest training institutes to include content on MPs and associated traditional knowledge

      Over 350 front-line staff of state forest departments and community members including traditional healers, local traders, rural youth and women trained through the Village Botanist Course, workshops, and exposure visits

Funding Support by



Donor Name Amount Contributed
Global Environment Facility (GEF) US$ 4,935,000



Expenditure in Previous Fiscal Years

Year Amount
2013 US$ 990,375
2012 US$ 1,343,714
2011 US$ 652,314
2010 US$ 313,972
2009 US$ 570,288
2008 US$ 14,157

Stories of Change

Conservation of Medicinal Plants

Conservation of Medicinal Plants
India has a rich resource base of medicinal plants, plush with about 8,000 different species. According to the Government of India (GoI), traditional medicines are the sole means of health care for about 65 percent of the population.


In the News

Project Overview
Status
Ongoing
Project Start Date:
2008
Estimated End Date:
2014
Geographic Coverage:
Arunachal Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Uttarakhand
Focus Area:
Environment and Energy
MDG:
Goal 7- Ensure Environmental Sustainability
Project Officer:
Ruchi Pant
Partners:
Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India; National Medicinal Plants Board; State Forest Departments and State Medicinal Plants Boards of Arunachal Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Uttarakhand; National Biodiversity Authority; Indira Gandhi National Forest Academy; Foundation for Revitalization of Local Health Traditions
Highlights
  • Uncontrolled harvesting of medicinal and aromatic plants is destroying the livelihoods of local communities
  • Twenty-one Medicinal Plant Development Areas declared in three states have concentrated efforts in species diverse locations
  • Over 12,000 home herbal gardens set up in Chhattisgarh with the help of Traditional Healers Association
  • Over 350 front-line staff of state forest departments and community members trained through Village Botanist Course, workshops, and exposure visits
  • Better understanding of diversity of species through comprehensive botanical and ecological surveys
  • Nineteen species identified as threatened through Conservation Assessment and Management Plan exercises held in the three project states