Disaster Risk Reduction

women
In Bangladesh, UNDP and EU supported the communities to "build back better". 15,746 flood-resilient homes, built on concrete stilts, were constructed for vulnerable communities. Photo: UNDP Bangladesh/GMB Akash.

Disasters put hard won development achievements at risk, reversing economic growth and progress towards the elimination of poverty; cause environmental damage; and result in human suffering. Development efforts that are sensitive to the risk of disasters and disaster preparedness before a natural hazard occurs reduce the need for humanitarian and development support later on. Prevention costs a fraction of what recovery costs – not just in financial but most importantly in human terms. Disaster recovery activities are often an opportunity to integrate improved disaster resilience into communities and to build back better.

Some results of the UNDP-EU partnership in reducing the risks from disasters:

  • In Bangladesh, 3.5 million people were evacuated in 2011 thanks to a more effective flood early warning system, coupled with a network of over 48,500 volunteers - supported and trained through UNDP-EU joint activities.
  • In Haiti, Myanmar and Pakistan the partnership continues to support communities as they recover from the devastating natural disasters suffered in 2010
  • In the Himalayan region, we worked with countries to reduce risks from flooding caused by glacial lake outbursts
  • In Bangladesh, UNDP and EU supported the communities to "build back better" after a disaster. 15,746 flood-resilient homes, built on concrete stilts, were constructed for vulnerable communities

The UNDP-EU partnership supports countries to be better prepared for disasters such as earthquakes, landslides, avalanches, floods, storms, hurricanes, tsunamis or drought. An example of this is the work we do with countries and communities where we help them integrate disaster risk reduction in national planning processes. This makes them less vulnerable and better prepared should a disaster hit, and it also gives them an early start on the immediate response to the disaster.

Our collaboration in the area of disaster risk reduction includes programmes at the community level to create awareness and help them prepare for the eventuality of a disaster and to develop local disaster plans and capacities. We have facilitated the sharing of experiences within and among countries and have developed stronger links between the national and local levels as well as among cities. Another important area of support is that of risk identification and early warning, something that the partnership has also supported with regional, national and local level programmes.  

In recent years, the UNDP-EU partnership has deepened in the area of so called Post Disaster Needs Assessments (PDNA). A PDNA is a government-led exercise with the support of the EU, the UN system and the World Bank that brings together national and international stakeholders to align recovery efforts in a coordinated way. It brings together information on economic damages and losses, and the recovery priorities – including the human development needs of the affected population – into a single consolidated assessment report. This information is used as a basis for developing a comprehensive recovery framework, to guide the design and implementation of early and long-term recovery programmes and to help determine international development assistance needs.

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Our Initiatives

Post Disaster Needs Assessments

In recent years, the UNDP-EU partnership has deepened in the area of so called Post Disaster Needs Assessments (PDNA). In 2008, the EU, the World Bank and the UN signed a joint declaration committing to collaborate and develop a common approach to post-crisis needs assessments and recovery planning. The joint declaration covered the assessments needed after a conflict (PCNA) and after a disaster (PDNA). More

More initiatives
UNDP's work on disaster risk reduction

UNDP helps develop the capacity of governments in over 60 countries to respond to disasters and mitigate the risk they pose. UNDP is guiding policy; training communities and first responders; helping planners; and integrating disaster risk reduction strategies into national development plans.

UNDP Global website
Climate Risk Reduction in the Himalayan Region

The Regional Climate Risk Reduction Project is being implemented in four countries in the Hindu Kush Himalayan region (Bhutan, India, Nepal and Pakistan).

 

The Project is supported by the EU through DIPECHO and seeks to develop and implement comprehensive risk management strategies in the Himalayan region to reduce the risks faced by mountain communities and to mitigate the impacts of hydro-meteorological/climatic hazards.

View More on Project Website
Bangladesh: Disaster risk reduction as development

Bangladesh has a long history of natural disasters. Between 1980 and 2008, it experienced 219 natural disasters, causing over US$16 billion in total damage. The predicted effects of climate change will only compound these impacts.


UNDP and partners - including the European Union - have supported Bangladesh in addressing its vulnerability to disaster.

 

Read more about the initiative
UNDP-EU collaborate on Post Disaster Needs Assessments

A PDNA is a government-led exercise with the support of the EU, the UN system and the World Bank that brings together national and international stakeholders to align recovery efforts in a coordinated way.

Read more